I thoroughly enjoyed the article and am waiting for my husband to get off work to discuss taking your course. I have been struggling to find the next step in my career and I keep leaving my job searches to research free lance writing instead. I have always loved writing creatively and journaling, and I think I’m ready to really jump into this for a career.

Your article is helpful, and I plan to try some of these. Over the last couple years I’ve inadvertently picked up some writing jobs by good fortune that have paid .30 – .50/word, but writing was always a sideline. Now I want to do more of it – but searches are yielding abysmal and depressing results. My content is rarely and minimally edited (by professional editors)and I turn it in on time with solid grammar and syntax. I’ve been looking and finding gigs at .01/word or less. No wonder so much of the writing I read on the web is crap, including articles written by those who don’t know the difference between “less” and “fewer.” I hope your tips will help me find some quality gigs. After all, my name is attached to it even if there’s no byline.
Third, The Write Life has put together a great list of resources you can check out. You can find it here: http://thewritelife.com/resources/. The very first section is on blogging, but there’s also lots of other material to help you with all sorts of writing careers. If there’s ever anything else I or The Write Life can help you with, don’t hesitate to reach out!

Sell T-shirts, posters, mugs, hats, or even bags with your design or beautiful quotes. Drop shipping services like Printful handle all the printing, packaging, branding and even sending in your place. You just have to upload designs, attract buyers and then receive your profit. Some users have reported earning over $1,200 in three weeks with this service.[2]


But even if you don’t burrow down into copywriting, freelance writing is definitely worth another look. If you’re able to type fast, you should be able put together a decent blog post in about an hour (once you get the hang of it, which typically doesn’t take very long). If you charge a client $50 for that blog post (which is a pretty typical beginner/advanced beginner rate), you’ve just made $50 for an hour’s worth of work. And the best part is, many businesses will want to hire a writer for recurring work, so it’s not like you have to find a new client every time you want an assignment.
Online teaching jobs can be found at a number of different websites across the web. If you’re interested in TEFL jobs, VIPKID, Gogokid, EF Education First, and Hawo American Academy are legit sites to look for jobs. For general tutoring, websites like Tutor.com and Varsity Tutors are good places to start. Keep in mind that you’ll likely need to complete a video interview before being hired.
Have lots opinions on what works and what doesn't on the web? Then you might just be right for a "career" in remote usability testing. Actually, no one really makes a career at it, but user testers can pick up some extra work reviewing websites or mobile applications that may still be in development. You don't even necessarily have to be very knowledgeable about the Internet because some developers want the beginner's point of view.
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