I noticed that you suggested creating health content for a client. I am a retired medical practitioner with a secondary degree and experience in areas related to public health and safety. I believe I could be helpful by writing content for, or at least editing for, medical science or public health entities. I’m willing to cold-pitch but don’t know where to find these. I’m not even sure of whether cold- pitching is best for the sciences or public service. Please advise?
In conclusion, please note that survey sites are another great source for extra cash paid regularly. There aren't exactly online jobs that pay weekly, but you can only get paid as often as you have money pending. Even though the cash out threshold is low on these, you won't be able to cash out if you aren't getting survey invites and qualifying into the surveys. But if you have money in your account, the potential is there to get the money almost as soon as you need it.
These are not get-rich-quick opportunities. You will need to work but the potential is there. As an example, the second one on our list is freelance writing. If you're a good writer, you can hit the ground running and earn hundreds of dollars to write once you find the right clients. If you're not a good writer, you may get paid less as you get better and find more clients. The potential is there but so is the work.

What It Is: Think Mary Kay (cosmetics), Pampered Chef (kitchenware), or Rodan + Fields (skincare) — over time, you build a base of clients to whom you sell a company's wares. "There are several reasons why I decided to become a consultant," says Rodan + Fields independent consultant Debbie Royer. "I had seen how much of a blessing the business had been to a friend of mine and my sister-in-law. Plus, everything can be done from my phone, and being a mom to a preschooler and an infant I don't have a lot of extra time to be sitting at a computer."
You may have to release your inner entrepreneur to make this one happen, but it can be lucrative if you have an eye for an online bargain. Sites like Flippa.com list websites and domains for sale. You might be able to pick up a domain for $10 and sell it for $1,000. Or you might be able to buy an inactive website for $1,000, reactivate it, and sell it for $10,000.
How to Get It: Begin with sites like UserTesting.com, YouEye.com and Userlytics.com. Register with multiple companies for opportunities to test as many websites as possible. Once you're in the system, you'll be emailed when testers are needed, and if you're one of the first to respond, expect to spend 15 to 20 minutes completing the test. Many sites require a microphone and/or webcam, which are built into most laptops—but if you need to buy one, they aren't expensive. The tester sites typically pay within a week or two via PayPal.

Ugh. I’m so sorry to hear that. You’re not the only freelancer to have gotten lured into one of those sites. My rule of thumb, even as a newbie, was never to accept less than $10 for every 100 words, unless it was a fantastic gig that would get me good exposure. Even if you don’t have a portfolio, you should only take on projects you’ll be proud to show to other people when they ask what you’ve done. It sounds like you are creating good work right now, but unfortunately, it’s for a client who totally doesn’t deserve it.


Have lots opinions on what works and what doesn't on the web? Then you might just be right for a "career" in remote usability testing. Actually, no one really makes a career at it, but user testers can pick up some extra work reviewing websites or mobile applications that may still be in development. You don't even necessarily have to be very knowledgeable about the Internet because some developers want the beginner's point of view.
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