Because lawyers are seeking people who match the profile of potential real-life jurors, online jury companies ask detailed questions of applicants. You should never disclose your Social Security number or credit card or banking info. Companies typically pay $10 to $60 to online jurors. Since most online jury companies won’t need a lot of jurors, signing up for multiple companies gives you a better chance of getting picked for “jury duty.” 
I am looking for an excellent and experienced blog writer who also must love cats to write for my company's blog on an ongoing basis. We are a pet sitting company that caters exclusively to cats in the San Francisco Bay area (www.comfortedkitty.com). I am looking to have fresh and unique content that helps increase our business visibility in our service areas, especially those we are struggling to gain clients because they simply don't know that our company exists and gladly serves their area. And of course to give helpful information to prospective customers. Obviously content needs to center around cat-oriented topics. So someone very knowledgeable with cats is preferred in order to supplement my knowledge and ideas for blog topics. less more
This is very informative. I have always had a passion for writing and recently started a self hosted blog. my goal is to really get my name established, since I have no published work…yet and actually start doing what I am passionate about. This list gave me the tips I need to start on the right path. I will definitely subscribe and get the email course.
Some of the “gotcha” job offers from the past include check-cashing schemes, mystery shopping, medical billing “jobs” that require you to purchase expensive computer software, and craft-making jobs that ask you to pony up the cash for materials before you get started. And let’s not forget about the famous envelope-stuffing scam that was nothing more than a pyramid scheme designed to siphon money from as many people as possible.
I am looking for an excellent and experienced blog writer who also must love cats to write for my company's blog on an ongoing basis. We are a pet sitting company that caters exclusively to cats in the San Francisco Bay area (www.comfortedkitty.com). I am looking to have fresh and unique content that helps increase our business visibility in our service areas, especially those we are struggling to gain clients because they simply don't know that our company exists and gladly serves their area. And of course to give helpful information to prospective customers. Obviously content needs to center around cat-oriented topics. So someone very knowledgeable with cats is preferred in order to supplement my knowledge and ideas for blog topics. less more
Thank you for this post. I just recently got into freelance writing and I feel so stupid already. I found a blog that suggested odesk so I signed up with them and since I didn’t have a portfolio yet I applied for a job paying $20 for 10 articles due in one week. I’m halfway done but after reading this I don’t even want to complete the rest. I feel so cheated. I thought it would be a good way to get some experience under my belt but I have put so much time and energy in the articles I have done so far and it doesn’t even seem worth it. Should I even complete the job?
Like most work-at-home jobs, the amount of money you make depends on your experience level and any specialties you may have. According to Salary.com, annual salaries for technical support representatives range from roughly $29,600 to $43,300 with a median salary of $34,400 a year. That breaks down to about $16.50 an hour, but again this figure varies widely.
These are all great ideas. The problem, which I haven’t heard anyone address, is that all these places want to see a portfolio of your work. If you’re just starting out, it’s not likely you have one. In my case, I did extensive technical and creative writing for my previous company but it was all considered intellectual property for them, thereby preventing me from including it in any personal portfolio of mine. How does one build a portfolio if you already need one to get started?
Have lots opinions on what works and what doesn't on the web? Then you might just be right for a "career" in remote usability testing. Actually, no one really makes a career at it, but user testers can pick up some extra work reviewing websites or mobile applications that may still be in development. You don't even necessarily have to be very knowledgeable about the Internet because some developers want the beginner's point of view.
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