This is a job with much potential, in part because the title description covers many things. “You can fit your offerings to what you know how to do,” says Stephanie Foster, a former medical transcriptionist who runs the website HomeWithTheKids.com. One can own a virtual assistant business or work from home for a company that makes you available to other employers or clients. HomeWithTheKids.com, for example, currently features several such companies.
I am so glad to run across fellow writers who value what they do and will stand up and say so. Far too often we get treated like the “red headed step children” of the creative industries and many of us allow it. I tried ODesk and was not only appalled by the pay rates, but by the attitude of many clients. One of them even said outright that we should be grateful to make five dollars an article (for well researched, 1,000 word pieces) and how their last writer was far too “uppity” for his tastes. Well now, I posted a response that I cannot quote in polite company. LOL. So, thank you, your voice is much appreciated.

Get professional: Even if you’re only planning to do some surveys or microtasks, you’re still going to need to set up online accounts, save files and keep track of passwords. Make sure you’ve got all the necessary email accounts ready and that you have plans in place to organise your work. Going about this in a half-hearted way will never make you much money.
Pretty much every serious blogger and online entrepreneur I know has at least one virtual assistant. Think of a VA like an administrative assistant at a regular office building, except they are working remotely. Duties can include practically any administrative task you can think of – including handling emails, bookkeeping, completing sales, customer service, editing websites, and much more. Specializations in areas like social media management or online ad management is another option.
This is my foot in the door and I’m following some of your other tips in order to get myself out there even more. I’m an introvert, so this is new and difficult for me. I have questioned myself countless times and am feeling a bit impatient, but I’m trying to trust the process and take it one day at a time. The warmth and encouragement that come through in your writing have helped keep me going. Thank you Elna!
I actually DID write a PULSE piece on LinkedIn, about how I dropped the idea of Outsource ( http://www.linkedin.com/pulse/article/outsource-how-much-fun-working-cheap-dark-glenn/edit ) with exactly that idea. The race to the bottom with pay to plays and such, simply isn’t worth doing. It might be that *somebody* is making $$ on those sites, but example of person wanting *150 original* descriptions for some sort of fragrant oils on a budget of less than $500 is more often where those places go.
With a record number of open positions in the job market today, economists say now is the perfect time for job-seekers to not only negotiate the perks and benefits they want, but also their pay. To see what jobs are offering the work-from-home flexibility that many professionals desire, as well as a high salary, FlexJobs created this list of remote positions that pay $100,000 or more.
My girl came across this site, after I told her about losing a comment posting gig. I appreciate the time you took putting this together. I’ve been a part of the oDesk site for about 2 and a half years now, and I know all too well the struggle it is to get good paying work. oDesk is cool, but the foolishness that involves taking tests just so that you seem a little more proficient than the next person has always bugged me. I’ve been using oDesk as a starting point, and then convince my clients to move away so that we work together privately. My international clients hate all the extra fees. I’m really looking forward to trying the sites you mentioned, and once again Thanks for your time.
Oh, the joys of college! The only time where being frequently intoxicated and poor is socially acceptable. Indeed, getting through college is challenging enough—trying to take on work on top of your academic endeavors can be overwhelming. Here are the best online jobs for college students so you’re able to afford those kegs of Pabst and double pepperoni hot pockets.
In addition to large tech companies like Apple and Dell, at-home jobs for technical support representatives are available from any number of large companies who sell products with any type of technological component to them. Keep in mind that technology isn’t just limited to electronics. Companies selling any type of product with working parts may need technical support representatives to help customers with problems operating the product.
Usability testers are asked to perform tests based on their demographic profile (education, knowledge of the web, age, social media use, etc.). They are then given questions to address and/or tasks to perform, such as registering on a website and then providing feedback online. Reviews usually take about 15-20 minutes and earn typically about $10 each. After completing a review, testers are not paid until the client accepts their feedback. Work can be rejected and unpaid for technical problems, lack of detail, or other issues the client determines. 
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