Hi Elna! Thoroughly enjoyed this delightful, informative article. I am a full time paralegal with a B.A. in Journalism. I’m about 5 years away from retirement…and would like to shift from full time paralegal work to freelance writing. I’ve been writing a column (“Throwback Thursday”) in the local paper for a year now, for free, but of course I get the bylines from those which is how I’ve built my portfolio. How would you reccomend I transition to freelancing. I’m interested in writing about legal topics for lay people…such as how to find a good attorney…and small community life…and parenting.
To avoid any confusion, I want to make it clear first that virtual assistant work is not always non-phone, but it can be. Virtual assistants tend to do a little bit of everything, just depending on their skills/expertise. So if you are good at various non-phone tasks (social media marketing/moderation, writing, graphic design, research etc.), then you may be able to do work for some of the companies below putting those non-phone skills to work.

With that said, bloggers can expect to make a few hundred dollars a month up to tens of thousands. A blogger’s salary completely depends on their niche, their audience, and how skilled they are at promoting either their own products or somebody else’s. For example, while she is certainly at the top of the heap, our good friend Michelle makes about $50,000 a month from blog revenue alone.
While it may seem like these sites are your best best when you’re a newcomer, they’re largely a crapshoot when it comes to winning a project. These sites are a rush for the lowest bid, and you’re competing against hundreds if not thousands of other desperate freelancers prepared to sell their firstborn for the chance to write someone’s 250-page ebook. (Some writers have been able to make a decent buck on sites like Upwork, but they are often the exception rather than the rule and have usually invested huge amounts of time to make it happen.)

You mention starting a blog is beneficial for starting out and creating content. My initial fear is what to blog about, I have so many interests that I feel it’s hard to pick one and really be informed and educated about the subject. They include animals (2 time dog mom), hiking/outdoors (I live in the wonderful PNW) , motorcycles, travel, personal growth, all things sweet, and of coarse writing. How do I choose? Or somehow combine a couple?
Currently I’m working full time at a daycare and I’m trying to transition into writing freelance. It would be so amazing for so many reasons. Two reasons being writing is my passion and starting college I’m going to need a more flexible work schedule. My first question is do you think I’ll be able to, starting out at least, work nights? I can’t answer emails or calls at work because I work with children and I work long hours. Will companies want to work with me if I’m only available at night?
How to Get It:If you shot the video with your phone, open the YouTube app and hit "send." If you're uploading from a computer, visit YouTube, and click the "upload" button in the upper right corner of the screen. You'll see a place to drag your video file. To enroll in the partner program, click on YouTube settings, check the circle next to "Allow Advertisements," then click on "View Additional Features." On the YouTube monetization page, opt in. Generally, you must earn a minimum before you get paid, and YouTube pays monthly — if you don't earn enough in one month, the balance rolls over.

In this increasingly digital world, there has never been a better time to work from home. At-home jobs are the perfect opportunities for those struggling to secure a local gig, need to stay home for health reasons, have to care for a loved one, or simply don't relish the thought of dealing with a hectic commute every day. FlexJobs reported in their The State of Remote Jobs survey that, as of 2017, 43% of U.S. workers now work remotely — even if it's just a part-time side hustle to supplement their income. For remote jobs, you'll need a computer, some basic skills, and a can-do attitude. Click through this list of remote employment areas that are booming right now, plus find even more ways to make money from home.
With a record number of open positions in the job market today, economists say now is the perfect time for job-seekers to not only negotiate the perks and benefits they want, but also their pay. To see what jobs are offering the work-from-home flexibility that many professionals desire, as well as a high salary, FlexJobs created this list of remote positions that pay $100,000 or more.
Have lots opinions on what works and what doesn't on the web? Then you might just be right for a "career" in remote usability testing. Actually, no one really makes a career at it, but user testers can pick up some extra work reviewing websites or mobile applications that may still be in development. You don't even necessarily have to be very knowledgeable about the Internet because some developers want the beginner's point of view.
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