I am looking for an excellent and experienced blog writer who also must love cats to write for my company's blog on an ongoing basis. We are a pet sitting company that caters exclusively to cats in the San Francisco Bay area (www.comfortedkitty.com). I am looking to have fresh and unique content that helps increase our business visibility in our service areas, especially those we are struggling to gain clients because they simply don't know that our company exists and gladly serves their area. And of course to give helpful information to prospective customers. Obviously content needs to center around cat-oriented topics. So someone very knowledgeable with cats is preferred in order to supplement my knowledge and ideas for blog topics.
Students enrolled in an art program can use their creative skills to design logos and graphics for various companies. You may be able to find a part-time position with a single company to provide graphic design services, but it’s also possible that you’ll be able to make more with a more flexible schedule if you contract your services out to several different companies at once. Upwork and Freelancer.com are great starting points for this type of job.
Ugh. I’m so sorry to hear that. You’re not the only freelancer to have gotten lured into one of those sites. My rule of thumb, even as a newbie, was never to accept less than $10 for every 100 words, unless it was a fantastic gig that would get me good exposure. Even if you don’t have a portfolio, you should only take on projects you’ll be proud to show to other people when they ask what you’ve done. It sounds like you are creating good work right now, but unfortunately, it’s for a client who totally doesn’t deserve it.
This is the first post that I’ve read of yours and I just want to say thank you for publishing such an informative piece! I’m currently entering my senior year of college and I have recently become passionate about getting started with freelance writing. I’ve always enjoyed writing and would like to turn it into a career that allows me to pursue my goal of traveling to every country in the world (or most countries at least haha). I have no writing samples/portfolio and that’s where I’m kinda stuck right now. Im going to check out your blog for more tips on getting started! Thanks again!

In Canada (and the States I think) you can run a small business under your own legal name and you don’t have to register it. If you were running a dog grooming business or something, you’d need a formal “business license” but even with a home-based business you may still need one, but it’s unlikely and it’d depend on your city’s policy. Even if required, I’m sure many people unknowingly skip this step and life goes on!
When I started to work from home, I missed talking to people. A lot. But I soon found a friend. Every day, I would hear the UPS guy gunning his motor as he drove down my long driveway to deliver my packages. As soon as I would spot him, I’d fly out of the house and chat him up. And now he leaves the packages by the curb. Sure, the one big bonus of working from home is that it gets you away from the petty office politics and never-ending gossip.
I absolutely love this article Elna. Thank you so much for providing your top techniques on how to start as a freelance writer. I think I have read so much content from numerous bloggers about writing content, starting blogs, making a living writing, etc. but have not yet come across anything quite like your article. I was already familiar with some of your techniques, but this was only a few. The first thing I am excited to do is take your course. I am a stay at home/work at home wife and mother. I was laid off from my job of 7 years almost 3 years ago and have been struggling with contributing to my household after my last pregnancy. I have written for pleasure most of my life and want to be able to continue being home for my family. I never thought that I would consider cold pitching but the way you put it just makes so much sense. Literally reading your article I was in such awe and had several “A-ha” moments. Again, thank you for sharing.
Working remotely for an established company is similar to working a desk job except you get to work at home. Most jobs require you to chat with customers online or via the phone, but their biggest draw is the fact that you’ll earn an hourly wage and receive a (relatively) steady paycheck. You’ll usually be asked to work regular hours, but you can do it in your pajamas if you’d like. Even better, some companies might actually provide you with benefits.

Working remotely for an established company is similar to working a desk job except you get to work at home. Most jobs require you to chat with customers online or via the phone, but their biggest draw is the fact that you’ll earn an hourly wage and receive a (relatively) steady paycheck. You’ll usually be asked to work regular hours, but you can do it in your pajamas if you’d like. Even better, some companies might actually provide you with benefits.


Hi Elna I am interested in writing. In high school I actually wanted to become a writer for photography, blogs,health, creative writing. But now about 8 years later I have no experience and no schooling but would love to get into it. Where do I start even creating a portfolio? I’d love to take your class but unfortunately I do not have any upfront money for that. Thank you in advance if you reply.
Holly fell into freelance writing on a whim. She submitted several pitches for guest posts and ended up landing a few clients. After roughly 6 months of freelancing on the side, she was making enough money to replace her income and work at home full-time. Now, she makes over $200,000 a year from writing alone. Not bad for a home-based business, eh?
Thank you so much Elna for these 20 tips. I am new to freelance writing and have recently read Writer For Hire: 101 Secrets to Freelance Success by Kelly James-Enger, and would recommend it to anyone, but was still feeling that I needed more. A quick google search led me to this blog post of yours which has given me the extra boost I needed. Many of my ‘How do I get started?’ questions have been answered. I am taking one of your free courses and am planning on taking your ‘Write To 1K’ course very soon. The price for your course is very reasonable and I can’t wait to start. A quick scan of your blog has assured me that I have found a goldmine of resources and I want to thank you again for taking the time to share your learning curve and your experience with us all.
As a TTEC@Home associate, you'll use our technology to support and assist customers with a variety of customer service and technical needs. This could include helping customers over the phone, via chat, or on social media. Best of all, you can do it all while wearing your slippers or flip flops! (To get started, you’ll need internet access and a home phone. Bunny slippers are optional.)

I am building a website and an app to allow people in a community to dynamically carpool and will need someone to help with the contents. English isn't my first language, however I do write it quite well. I will work with the writer on each step of the development to get to the objective as quick as possible by providing him or her any information needed on a timely manner. All content in the app as well as content for the website will be done by whoever is hired. However, what I need right now is just a few pages for the prototype. The full website development will ensue as ideas get validated. Prices can be negotiated along the development. less more


Hi there, I was wondering if you could offer any advice. I have now submitted two heavily researched health/medical articles for a popular body building women’s magazine, one article (two page spread 1000 words) was published last week, and the other (3-4 page spread 1500 words) is due for publication in the next month. How can propose to the editor, to transition me from doing this for free, to freelancing in a paid role? I have a medical degree and am writing about medical/health related content. I would love to continue writing for the magazine, but equally, I would like to get paid for the many many hours of research, though synthesis and data collection I put into these articles. Any advice is kindly appreciated.
Thank you so much for replying, Elna! Thank you for all of the information you provide on here. Your advice and posts have given me a lot to work with during this time of dead ends instead of beating my head against the wall trying to figure out how to get more work. I’m at the point where I am down to one job while the other is communicating less and less with me so it’s making me nervous. Thank you, thank you, thank you for providing this resource!
Elna I have to say, your writing is truly the most informational! I kept reading, thinking wow! This is awesome information! I can’t wait to comment and let them know how much I loved this article. But, I didn’t realize who wrote it until the end… I guess I was just so into the content. But then I realized no way Elna again!!? You always have the BEST articles! Another article I loved! I hope to freelance write soon and do it well like you! Well done Elna! I only came across your work about 1-2 months ago I think but since I found you, you are always inspiring me! I’m definitely a big fan of yours! Its no surprise people want to work with you! You are great at what you do!! Thanks again!
There are over 600 of these posts. New blog posts go up once or twice a week. If you don't want to miss any of them, you should either sign up for my twice weekly update newsletter that will send you links to any new blog posts (along with some bonus legit online jobs), or sign up to the email RSS — which means you'll get each blog post sent to your email in it's entirety not long after it goes up.
I’ve been rigorously studying freelancing for a while now (I plan on getting started after school ends in the first week of April) and I have to say your bog has been very helpful, especially this post. I thought cold mailing and job boards were the only places to find freelance writing job, and that it would be quite tough finding a job given the competition, but after going through this list, I think finding a job would be easier.
Thank you so much for writing this post Elna. It has been really very helpful indeed. I have been a part time freelance writer for about 6 months now but still feel like I am finding my feet. This post has given me a boost and some new options to follow up. It certainly seems like the strategy should be to go at it hammer and tongs and never, ever give up! Thanks again. I look forward to exploring your website some more.

I vehemently disagree with you here. Content mills horribly abuse writers and make it difficult for people who have spent years in this field to get a fair wage due to the expectation that companies can pay less to get more. Also, writers who start out here often get stuck in a rut and can’t evolve past the oDesk stage. All around bad news and not recommended for anyone who wants an actual career in writing.
What It Is: Companies like Google and Yahoo give you information to search for, and you tell them how closely their results matched what you were looking for. Does a search for Lady Antebellum turn up sites about the music group or links to pre-Civil War period information? If you are Latina, for example, you might be asked to search the way a Spanish speaker might perform a search in English.
Work at home transferring data from one source to another. Most of these companies do not require past experience, although with few exceptions the pay may not be enough to consider it a stable income. Before you begin applying to any of the companies below (many of which sadly are almost never hiring), you might want to read the post I wrote about data entry jobs from home. It explains what your expectations should be prior to pursuing a career in this industry.
What It Is: Think Mary Kay (cosmetics), Pampered Chef (kitchenware), or Rodan + Fields (skincare) — over time, you build a base of clients to whom you sell a company's wares. "There are several reasons why I decided to become a consultant," says Rodan + Fields independent consultant Debbie Royer. "I had seen how much of a blessing the business had been to a friend of mine and my sister-in-law. Plus, everything can be done from my phone, and being a mom to a preschooler and an infant I don't have a lot of extra time to be sitting at a computer."

How to Get It: Begin with sites like UserTesting.com, YouEye.com and Userlytics.com. Register with multiple companies for opportunities to test as many websites as possible. Once you're in the system, you'll be emailed when testers are needed, and if you're one of the first to respond, expect to spend 15 to 20 minutes completing the test. Many sites require a microphone and/or webcam, which are built into most laptops—but if you need to buy one, they aren't expensive. The tester sites typically pay within a week or two via PayPal.


Home-based work can be broken down into two separate categories: jobs where you work for yourself (and have unlimited income potential) and jobs in which you work for somebody else (with an income ceiling). Neither type necessarily requires you to work full-time. However, these are all online jobs – which means you’ll need a high-speed internet connection in order to work from home.
These are not get-rich-quick opportunities. You will need to work but the potential is there. As an example, the second one on our list is freelance writing. If you're a good writer, you can hit the ground running and earn hundreds of dollars to write once you find the right clients. If you're not a good writer, you may get paid less as you get better and find more clients. The potential is there but so is the work.
Many ESL tutoring sites provide everything you need in the way of lesson plans, and you just follow along. In order to teach, you’ll generally need a home computer that can do video chat along with noise-cancelling headphones with a microphone. Some companies require you have a college degree. Find out more in my Teach English Online post, or click through to see if these sites are hiring right away:
At the end of the day, you are just one person, and you have a limited amount of time. So, you have to do things that are meaningful to you. While an overall goal may be meaningful, not all of the milestones needed to get there may be meaningful. Because we all have our strengths and weaknesses, likes and dislikes, not every task will be enjoyable or all fun & games. Some simply require pure willpower and discipline to grind through. And that is where delegation comes in.
Have lots opinions on what works and what doesn't on the web? Then you might just be right for a "career" in remote usability testing. Actually, no one really makes a career at it, but user testers can pick up some extra work reviewing websites or mobile applications that may still be in development. You don't even necessarily have to be very knowledgeable about the Internet because some developers want the beginner's point of view.
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