Of course, FlexJobs is not the only site for finding remote work and jobs you can do from home. Upwork is the largest marketplace for freelancers in the world, with demand for nearly any remote-friendly skill set. Then there are the niche sites, like We Work Remotely, where the majority of job posters are early stage startups looking for talented engineers. Still, FlexJobs may be the winner: its robust, easy-to-navigate system offers tens of thousands of jobs from thousands of employers at any one time. If you’re serious about finding remote work you can do from home or on the road, there’s no better place to look.
I thoroughly enjoyed the article and am waiting for my husband to get off work to discuss taking your course. I have been struggling to find the next step in my career and I keep leaving my job searches to research free lance writing instead. I have always loved writing creatively and journaling, and I think I’m ready to really jump into this for a career.
I hope you would agree, that it would have been ideal to delegate this task to the handyman. That would have saved you time and effort, so that you and your husband could focus on doing other things that were more important to you, like being there for your kids or spending time with each other. This is just one example of how we often impose busyness on ourselves without us even realizing it.
I recently came across some of your posts after searching for new ways to find and pitch freelance writing clients. While I’ve been working as a freelancer for a few years now, it never hurts to look for ways to expand my business. There’s a lot of crap out there on the Web that offers the same old suggestions for locating writing clients (usually accompanied by a heavy sales pitch to sign up for an expensive workshop). This article offered fresh ideas and unique details about the standard job sources–I was really impressed! Thank you! I am going to put some of these ideas into my business plan this month.

While it may seem like these sites are your best best when you’re a newcomer, they’re largely a crapshoot when it comes to winning a project. These sites are a rush for the lowest bid, and you’re competing against hundreds if not thousands of other desperate freelancers prepared to sell their firstborn for the chance to write someone’s 250-page ebook. (Some writers have been able to make a decent buck on sites like Upwork, but they are often the exception rather than the rule and have usually invested huge amounts of time to make it happen.)

To get hired, you fill out an application and take an exam to test your knowledge. “If you pass, you go through a mock session with an experienced tutor who assumes the role of student and evaluates your creativity, empathy and teaching skills,” says Cindy Hamen Farrar, Ph.D., senior director of academic tutoring at Tutor. “We look for people who know their subject matter and who can break it down and communicate effectively.”

OK, if you’re really, REALLY hungry and need to make ends meet that month, and that’s all you’ve got currently, I’ll allow it. But otherwise? Your skills and time are worth far more, and there ARE clients out there who will recognize and honor that. Hold out for the good ones. (See: my upcoming article on how we writers need to learn to value (and insist on the value of) our own talents higher than we often do.) 🙂

Some pages on this site contain affiliate links in which I get paid a commission if a purchase is made. I only endorse products or services I've used or gotten great feedback from. In most cases, I endorse products without being an affiliate or receiving any compensation and would never recommend anything if I had concerns that you might not be satisfied with it.

Because of the booming popularity of audio and video, transcriptionists are finding work through a variety of different means. Many companies hire transcriptionists to turn their audio or video recordings into marketing or training materials. Video marketers (think YouTubers) may also hire transcriptionists to transcribe their recordings into written form so they can sell their services and products online. Law firms and government agencies also hire qualified legal transcriptionists to work for them.
Usability testers are asked to perform tests based on their demographic profile (education, knowledge of the web, age, social media use, etc.). They are then given questions to address and/or tasks to perform, such as registering on a website and then providing feedback online. Reviews usually take about 15-20 minutes and earn typically about $10 each. After completing a review, testers are not paid until the client accepts their feedback. Work can be rejected and unpaid for technical problems, lack of detail, or other issues the client determines. 
×