How to Get It: Begin with sites like UserTesting.com, YouEye.com and Userlytics.com. Register with multiple companies for opportunities to test as many websites as possible. Once you're in the system, you'll be emailed when testers are needed, and if you're one of the first to respond, expect to spend 15 to 20 minutes completing the test. Many sites require a microphone and/or webcam, which are built into most laptops—but if you need to buy one, they aren't expensive. The tester sites typically pay within a week or two via PayPal.

This is my foot in the door and I’m following some of your other tips in order to get myself out there even more. I’m an introvert, so this is new and difficult for me. I have questioned myself countless times and am feeling a bit impatient, but I’m trying to trust the process and take it one day at a time. The warmth and encouragement that come through in your writing have helped keep me going. Thank you Elna!

These are all great ideas. The problem, which I haven’t heard anyone address, is that all these places want to see a portfolio of your work. If you’re just starting out, it’s not likely you have one. In my case, I did extensive technical and creative writing for my previous company but it was all considered intellectual property for them, thereby preventing me from including it in any personal portfolio of mine. How does one build a portfolio if you already need one to get started?

“I love being a part of TTEC@home because of the flexibility of the schedule. There are way more benefits to working from home than most people realize. I save money on transportation and clothing. I save time. I have a tax write-off. And I have less anxiety. The bonus of working with TTEC is that I’ve met some great people and have learned new skills.”
Many ESL tutoring sites provide everything you need in the way of lesson plans, and you just follow along. In order to teach, you’ll generally need a home computer that can do video chat along with noise-cancelling headphones with a microphone. Some companies require you have a college degree. Find out more in my Teach English Online post, or click through to see if these sites are hiring right away:
9. Amazon mTurk – Amazon Mechanical Turk is the lion of microtask sites and you can find data entry work among their thousands of available tasks. Once you register with their site, you can select HITs (Human Intelligence Tasks) that sound interesting to you; sometimes, you must complete a qualifier to land the task. You’re only paid if your work is accepted. There can be some shady tasks listed on mTurk, so be careful and don’t pick up any HITs that feel wrong. Payment is made via Amazon gift cards or through bank deposit.
Hello, I'm looking for a high quality ghostwriter to write a gripping, page-turning urban romance story. It will be ~50,000 words in length, and please be familiar with urban/AA/interracial romance and their tropes. You will also have to sign a contract/NDA to assign rights to the work. I'm reasonable and flexible when it comes to deadlines: I understand that real life can happen and I always strive to preserve a business relationship where possible. I'm also an author and I get it. Please apply to this job if you think you would be a good match. I will have to see an example of your writing, preferably in this genre. Get paid to write what you love! less more
Get professional: Even if you’re only planning to do some surveys or microtasks, you’re still going to need to set up online accounts, save files and keep track of passwords. Make sure you’ve got all the necessary email accounts ready and that you have plans in place to organise your work. Going about this in a half-hearted way will never make you much money.
GlassDoor estimates that teachers at Tutor earn $9 to $14 an hour. “Depending on the subject mix and number of hours you work, you could make between a few hundred to a few thousand dollars per month,” Farrar says. Chegg’s rates start at $20 per hour, estimating that tutors can make up to $1,000 a month. WyzAnt’s rates run $24 to $36 per hour, according to GlassDoor.
Usability testers are asked to perform tests based on their demographic profile (education, knowledge of the web, age, social media use, etc.). They are then given questions to address and/or tasks to perform, such as registering on a website and then providing feedback online. Reviews usually take about 15-20 minutes and earn typically about $10 each. After completing a review, testers are not paid until the client accepts their feedback. Work can be rejected and unpaid for technical problems, lack of detail, or other issues the client determines. 
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