This is an awesome post! Very informative and extremely useful. Good job! You definitely made a fantastic impression on me. I will be in touch as I seriously want to leave my “procrastination sphere” to a “professional world” of blogging. I am an English tutor and it’s just ripe for me to hold the blogging world to ransome and claim my share of the fun that goes with blogging.

Editor of Splashpress Media, Noemi used to be an English teacher before going freelance full-time. She has a penchant for words and likes to play around with them - the result of a lifetime of burying her nose in books. Having been bitten by the travel bug, she aims to discover more languages & places in the near future as she continues to do what she loves most - writing.
A few other things I plan to try: 1) buying cheap advertising in some niche publications where writing services aren’t usually advertised but the need is high; 2) adding an online content store to my author’s website I’m developing, so I can sell ready-made content directly to clients (kind of like Constant Content but without the middle man); and 3) pitching to website developers who might want to offer content services as a package deal to their clients. I have no idea if any of these strategies will work, but it’s always better to do something than nothing, right?
Thank you so much for writing this post Elna. It has been really very helpful indeed. I have been a part time freelance writer for about 6 months now but still feel like I am finding my feet. This post has given me a boost and some new options to follow up. It certainly seems like the strategy should be to go at it hammer and tongs and never, ever give up! Thanks again. I look forward to exploring your website some more.
Thanks so much and I’m happy to hear you figured out why you weren’t succeed at freelance writing 🙂 As for your question, web design companies wouldn’t give you a list; you would collaborate with them. Usually the are contracted to do a site with site content and if their staff writer is too busy or not there, they may hire it out. That’s where you come into play!
As a TTEC@Home associate, you'll use our technology to support and assist customers with a variety of customer service and technical needs. This could include helping customers over the phone, via chat, or on social media. Best of all, you can do it all while wearing your slippers or flip flops! (To get started, you’ll need internet access and a home phone. Bunny slippers are optional.)
Haven’t much advice to give you on blogging – except join as many writers’ forums at LInked In, if you haven’t done yet. You see, I am more comfortable in writing articles than blogs. I have heard (from joining a lot of LI writing forums) – of a lot of successful/well-paid bloggers there who might be able to help you – to name a few – Francesca Nicasio, a US-based Filipina blogger, Carol Tice (US), Bamidele Omnibalusi (Africa), and more.
From my own experience, I’ve used Textbroker to make quick cash for bills. They pay every week on Fridays and if you work a lot every day, you can usually have a substantial amount accumulated by the end of the week — definitely more than the $10 cash out threshold. The only bad thing there is you never know how much work they’ll have up to grab from the order board. But I would say that for me Textbroker has been an excellent source for getting bill money together when I need it quick. Amazon Mturk is another idea. You can cash out there at just $1 and it transfers to your bank account. There is an entire sub-forum about Mturk over at the Work Place Like Home forum where people discuss the best tasks to accept to make the most money. Mturk has a reputation for being just an extra money option, but I know for a fact there are some people making more than just extra money over there.
Hey Elna! I am currently working towards breaking into the field of freelance editing and your advice has helped me immensely. I’ll be finishing my degree this year and I’ve been feeling anxious about future job opportunities (and lack thereof). After reading this, I feel so much more at ease. Do you have any tips for students who still need to gain experience?

Thank you so much for this information. I’m currently a massage therapist and pregnant with my first child. Knowing I’ll need extra income for baby expenses has me searching for alternative ways to make money before the baby arrives. I’ve always enjoyed writing and hope to finish my first book within the next two years so getting paid to write seems fabulous. From the tips you’ve provided, my first steps will be to google “publication pay submission”, check Craigslist and Sophie Lizard’s newsletter. I look forward to getting back to you shortly with an incredible praise report!! Thanks again!!
Your blog post has been extremely helpful, thank you so much! I’ve been doing some freelance writing on Upwork for a while now. I don’t take any gigs that pay anything below $10/100 words, but it’s often difficult to find clients that appreciate your work there. Most of the gigs are the “$0.5/100 words ABLE TO WRITE 3000 WORD A DAY AT LEAST” type which is sad. I’m gonna run with some of your suggestions here and see how it goes.
A word of caution: Remember that where very little is required, very little is offered. These jobs don’t pay much, and they are not going to provide a reference for your resume. It may take working at several different of these online jobs to pull in the income you want. And as always, know the signs of a work-at-home scam as you sort through the opportunities.
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