Completing surveys is similar to microworking in many ways – it’s good to sign up with more than one service, and it’s wise to keep an active eye on new incoming surveys so you can grab them before anyone else can. There’s also the added benefit that completing surveys really doesn’t feel like work – it’s a pretty mindless thing you can do whilst semi-concentrating on something else. If you’re handy with your computer, you can usually blast through them a little quicker than expected too.
While most of these companies advertise that you can earn upwards of $18 or so an hour, the reality is that you're not going to make that much once you figure in your gas expenses and wear and tear on your car. Also, work may not always come in consistently. I would recommend doing more than one of these if you really want to make it worth your while.
Also, I personally have a membership to FlexJobs. It's $14.95 a month, but you get access to carefully curated, guaranteed scam-free work from home job leads. It's not for everyone, but I've overall been impressed with the site. It may be worth signing up for a month just to see if you think it will benefit you in your job search. Canceling is very easy if you don't think it's for you.
Thank you so much for replying, Elna! Thank you for all of the information you provide on here. Your advice and posts have given me a lot to work with during this time of dead ends instead of beating my head against the wall trying to figure out how to get more work. I’m at the point where I am down to one job while the other is communicating less and less with me so it’s making me nervous. Thank you, thank you, thank you for providing this resource!

I have a lot to share with personal experience and speaking with passion from the heart about health and diet. I know lifestyle, health and diet topics are my niche, in particular veganism and raw foods. I have strong spiritual practices such as fasting, meditating, yoga etc and know there is a client base looking for writers on these topics. Are you able to advise me or direct me to clients and sites focused on these topics?


Find the best remote writing jobs here. Are you passionate about writing on a specific topic? Do you work well with a variety of clients and under tight deadlines? You may be the right fit for remote writing job. Remote writers are frequently hired for freelance or contract positions, but there are often positions available for full-time remote writers.
BizScript SEO is looking for some creative web content writers to join our team! MUST HAVES: -Strong knowledge of SEO and SEM -Strong writing and grammatical skills -Knowledgeable on WordPress -Is okay with helping upkeep our blog by posting one article a week on SEO or SEM -Very responsible and has GREAT time management skills Being a start-up, we are looking for freelancers with adjustable, low rates but who are interested in helping our business grow. We aren't looking for freelancers that just want to do one project. We want to form an on-going relationship with you and allow you to be part of our team. As of right now, we will only require your for 5 to 10 hours a week.
This past year has been a roller coaster ride for me. I want to give freelance writing a try. I did get accepted to a content mill site, but the jobs on there go so fast I can never get a chance to grab one to work on. 🙁 I do not have a portfolio and I’ve never made one. I also do not blog anymore. So, how can I get into freelance writing? How do I build up a portfolio or show my writing? Free hosting is all I can do now, and I’m sure that is going to be a turn off to a client. Any tips would be great. Thanks.
From caterers to bands to florists, saying “I do” is big business. And now there’s a new niche in the $58 billion wedding industry that could score you a little dough. Bridesmaid for Hire provides professional services for brides. While some of the tasks involve helping out on the big day (or even standing with the wedding party as an actual bridesmaid), many responsibilities are handled remotely via emails and social media.
What an informative and fun article. While I’ve been writing for years, I’ve never had the courage to venture out because I haven’t got a degree, and feel very intimidated by a lack of formal education. But, when I say I’ve been writing for years, I mean I have been asked by everyone to write almost everything…including breakup up letters, condolence cards to the family of a murder victim, return texts in the middle of a text-fight (those are fun) and even an anonymous letter to a woman who’s best friend spotted her husband with another woman. (Not fun.) I’ve written proposal letters for house-hunters, eulogies, on and on and on….and I love it. I’ll write anything (within my knowledge base) and be happy doing so. Finally, after my last request from a long ago former coworker, to write a plea to Salvation Army for assistance, I decided to try to finally do what I love and learn to profit from it.
Not only did you provide amazing information and helpful links but most importantly, you related to a wide audience. With that in mind, you maintained a positive outlook for all writers in different levels of their careers. I, personally, am just researching for ideas and ways to get started. Your article was not only helpful, but inspirational as it was honest and relatable.
I am thankful for this site, thread and continued posts including yours. At present I am an IC with Textbroker International, and try to look at most the jobs as blessings in disguise. Generally, I am a better conversationalist since starting this in late September, agree with you about developing writing skills, and have kind of found my subject niche as it were. The big picture tells me I have it pretty good, given local opportunities and employment services for those of us who have a handicapability are inadequate in my place of residence. In a former profession I was under “supervision” before leaving and it was somewhat demeaning more than helpful. I hope your experience is dynamically different, but you sound quite capable and willing to improve where need be which says a lot favorably concerning what you bring to the proverbial table. All the best to you Denita, enjoyed the chance to talk shop!
Being an at-home call-center rep requires a computer and may require specific software or equipment. A great phone voice helps as well, as does any experience in customer service, data entry, retail sales, or management. Dozens of sites list job openings for call-center representatives, including Upwork.com, Freelancer.com, and SimplyHired.com. However, you may also find listings offered by local businesses in your local newspaper.

Usability testers are asked to perform tests based on their demographic profile (education, knowledge of the web, age, social media use, etc.). They are then given questions to address and/or tasks to perform, such as registering on a website and then providing feedback online. Reviews usually take about 15-20 minutes and earn typically about $10 each. After completing a review, testers are not paid until the client accepts their feedback. Work can be rejected and unpaid for technical problems, lack of detail, or other issues the client determines. 
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