Thanks so much for reaching out to me! I’m so happy you are thinking about freelance writing! It really is a great way to work at home! As for your questions, clients won’t be bothered if you contact them in the evening. I work with clients in the UK, Germany, Tel Aviv and more! So, what’s my time is not their time! I would suggest though to try to wake up before you work to answer emails and pitch, even if for 30 minutes in the morning.
To avoid any confusion, I want to make it clear first that virtual assistant work is not always non-phone, but it can be. Virtual assistants tend to do a little bit of everything, just depending on their skills/expertise. So if you are good at various non-phone tasks (social media marketing/moderation, writing, graphic design, research etc.), then you may be able to do work for some of the companies below putting those non-phone skills to work.

A few other things I plan to try: 1) buying cheap advertising in some niche publications where writing services aren’t usually advertised but the need is high; 2) adding an online content store to my author’s website I’m developing, so I can sell ready-made content directly to clients (kind of like Constant Content but without the middle man); and 3) pitching to website developers who might want to offer content services as a package deal to their clients. I have no idea if any of these strategies will work, but it’s always better to do something than nothing, right?
What an informative and fun article. While I’ve been writing for years, I’ve never had the courage to venture out because I haven’t got a degree, and feel very intimidated by a lack of formal education. But, when I say I’ve been writing for years, I mean I have been asked by everyone to write almost everything…including breakup up letters, condolence cards to the family of a murder victim, return texts in the middle of a text-fight (those are fun) and even an anonymous letter to a woman who’s best friend spotted her husband with another woman. (Not fun.) I’ve written proposal letters for house-hunters, eulogies, on and on and on….and I love it. I’ll write anything (within my knowledge base) and be happy doing so. Finally, after my last request from a long ago former coworker, to write a plea to Salvation Army for assistance, I decided to try to finally do what I love and learn to profit from it.

I am totally new to this. I stumbled across a site on my facebook news feed for “freelance writers”. My curiosity led me to discover that such a thing exist. I enjoy writing mainly for my school assignments and topics that I am passionate about just leads to words flowing effortlessly from my head. I think I really want to learn more about this now that I have discovered it’s a thing! Glad your very informative post was the first I read. Now I am even more interested. I am also stunned by your dedication to respond to each person’s response. You really love what you do.


Thanks a lot for the article. Am a journalist by profession. I was writing for major print newspapers in Kenya East Africa plus online news agencies before I moved and settled in the US in Seattle together with my family. I haven’t written since 2014. Your article comes at the appropriate time for me since I have been looking for ways to break into fulltime freelance; copy writing, web content, editing and proofing. Back in Kenya I was writing about climate change, environment, agriculture and other related topics. Now I want more of a niche area and that is why I will look at your course to start. Thank you.
What Employees Say: “VIPKID pays between $14-22 an hour, plus more in incentives some months. Most kids are fun and well behaved. You create your own schedule and work as little or much as you want. The materials are already provided, you just have to review them beforehand and plan out how you want to teach the materials and which props you want to use.” —Current ESL Teacher
“I love being a part of TTEC@home because of the flexibility of the schedule. There are way more benefits to working from home than most people realize. I save money on transportation and clothing. I save time. I have a tax write-off. And I have less anxiety. The bonus of working with TTEC is that I’ve met some great people and have learned new skills.”
Who can resist the dinging sound of a new email? You, that’s who, especially if you want to stay on task. And forget about signing in to Facebook “just for a minute.” It’s easy to get distracted when you telecommute—unlikely distractions that just don’t exist at work abound at home. At the office, for example, you might visit the company kitchen once in the morning and once in the afternoon for a cup of joe (because that’s what’s appropriate), but at home, you’re hitting the fridge every hour on the hour. Or more.
Elna, this was such an incredibly helpful wealth of information for someone (me!) who’s just dipping their toe into the water of freelance writing and hoping to make a full time career out of it. I can’t thank you enough for putting this together. This article is the first time I’ve ever heard of your blog or had the pleasure of reading your work and I’m so impressed and inspired! Honestly, I hope to be as skilled and successful as you one day. Thank you so much for giving back to up and comers like me with this article. Love love love it! Thank you!
“I love being a part of TTEC@home because of the flexibility of the schedule. There are way more benefits to working from home than most people realize. I save money on transportation and clothing. I save time. I have a tax write-off. And I have less anxiety. The bonus of working with TTEC is that I’ve met some great people and have learned new skills.”
Fantastic article! I’ll definitely add this one to my bookmarks! Although I’m not exactly “new” to freelance writing, I have decided to make this year “my year.” My year to get off the job platform sites like Upwork. My year to make more money from freelancing, my year to pitch to clients – both locally and nationally. My year to be more successful than I have in the past. Many of the tips you shared in this post were several of the ones that I had already planned to do this year to ramp up my business. But, you’ve also added several others that I hadn’t considered! Thanks for the great, informative post!
Setting up a listing is a cinch. On Spot, you pin your parking space on the site’s map, snap a picture of it, establish your availability and rate (most sites will suggest a general estimate) and provide a payment method, like direct deposit or PayPal . When your spot gets rented, the site takes a commission of around 20%. And you’ve fattened your wallet by barely lifting a finger.
Your article is helpful, and I plan to try some of these. Over the last couple years I’ve inadvertently picked up some writing jobs by good fortune that have paid .30 – .50/word, but writing was always a sideline. Now I want to do more of it – but searches are yielding abysmal and depressing results. My content is rarely and minimally edited (by professional editors)and I turn it in on time with solid grammar and syntax. I’ve been looking and finding gigs at .01/word or less. No wonder so much of the writing I read on the web is crap, including articles written by those who don’t know the difference between “less” and “fewer.” I hope your tips will help me find some quality gigs. After all, my name is attached to it even if there’s no byline.
Transcription doesn’t require a lot of technical skill — you’re essentially just typing up what you hear. Every now and then you may need to take a critical ear to what’s going on if it sounds garbled, and the better you’re able to do this, the better your transcriptions are. But it’s not usually too challenging, and there’s a transcript “code” you can include in your transcript in any section that’s too garbled to understand.
Sell T-shirts, posters, mugs, hats, or even bags with your design or beautiful quotes. Drop shipping services like Printful handle all the printing, packaging, branding and even sending in your place. You just have to upload designs, attract buyers and then receive your profit. Some users have reported earning over $1,200 in three weeks with this service.[2]

As a transcriptionist, you will transcribe either video or voice recordings into written words. Although medical transcription is what usually comes to mind, the fact is that there is now far more need for general transcriptionists. With businesses and bloggers turning increasingly to podcasts and video to reach their audiences, these mediums are often turned into written content for marketing purposes or training materials.


I’ve been rigorously studying freelancing for a while now (I plan on getting started after school ends in the first week of April) and I have to say your bog has been very helpful, especially this post. I thought cold mailing and job boards were the only places to find freelance writing job, and that it would be quite tough finding a job given the competition, but after going through this list, I think finding a job would be easier.
That’s not to say that blogging isn’t a real work-from-home option. I personally know dozens of people who make more than six figures a year from their blog, including my own family. In fact, I’d highly encourage you to start a blog if you feel inclined. Eventually, it can be a great source of residual income. Just don’t go into it thinking you’re going to make a ton of money right out of the gate.
Of course, FlexJobs is not the only site for finding remote work and jobs you can do from home. Upwork is the largest marketplace for freelancers in the world, with demand for nearly any remote-friendly skill set. Then there are the niche sites, like We Work Remotely, where the majority of job posters are early stage startups looking for talented engineers. Still, FlexJobs may be the winner: its robust, easy-to-navigate system offers tens of thousands of jobs from thousands of employers at any one time. If you’re serious about finding remote work you can do from home or on the road, there’s no better place to look.
When the recession caused companies all across the country to close, workers turned to the Internet for jobs. Part-Time Online Jobs let people work flexible hours, and freelance workers can work as writers and editors or as residential sales representatives. Sales reps sell products through online websites and pages they create, through door to door sales, with cold calling techniques and with parties and events they host at home or at their customers' houses. They can sell advertising space, medical equipment, jewelry, home decor or hundreds of other items. Writers and editors often create content for website owners, write and publish their own books or work for leading newspapers and magazines. The number of teenagers working Part-Time Online Jobs has increased in recent years, and more than five percent of all teens now work on a freelance basis.
Usability testers are asked to perform tests based on their demographic profile (education, knowledge of the web, age, social media use, etc.). They are then given questions to address and/or tasks to perform, such as registering on a website and then providing feedback online. Reviews usually take about 15-20 minutes and earn typically about $10 each. After completing a review, testers are not paid until the client accepts their feedback. Work can be rejected and unpaid for technical problems, lack of detail, or other issues the client determines. 
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