Hi, not trying to being rude or anything, but if you’re planning a career in writing, you might want to check your spelling and/or grammar before putting it out there. Just saying…again, it trying to be rude or mean. I wish the best of luck to you! I too, am trying to get some writing gigs, and just starting out. I have no idea where to even begin. With that said, I think constructive criticism is a good thing, that if we take need to, can help us out in the long run. If anyone has any constructive criticism or constructive advice for me, please comment. Thank you!
The University of Kansas prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, national origin, age, ancestry, disability, status as a veteran, sexual orientation, marital status, parental status, gender identity, gender expression, and genetic information in the university's programs and activities. Retaliation is also prohibited by university policy. The following persons have been designated to handle inquiries regarding the nondiscrimination policies and are the Title IX coordinators for their respective campuses: Director of the Office of Institutional Opportunity & Access, IOA@ku.edu, Room 1082, Dole Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue, Lawrence, KS 66045, 785-864-6414, 711 TTY (for the Lawrence, Edwards, Parsons, Yoder, and Topeka campuses); Director, Equal Opportunity Office, Mail Stop 7004, 4330 Shawnee Mission Parkway, Fairway, KS 66205, 913-588-8011, 711 TTY (for the Wichita, Salina, and Kansas City, Kansas medical center campuses).

Curiosity is great for learning about the world – and when you make your curiosity into work, you get to call it research and charge a fee! If you enjoy just researching and learning new things, you can find remote jobs that will pay you to either do research and compile data or answer specific questions their clients have. You can do general research or get hyper-specific – for example, in the right location, you could become a court researcher.

"I had a few different offers by the time I graduated, but I chose Deere because I would have not been able to forgive myself if I had passed this opportunity up. I was so impressed with the company when I did my internship at the Tractor Cab Assembly Operations facility in Waterloo, IA. The people were so nice and caring and the employee resource groups, especially NSBE (National Society of Black Engineers) really helped make a difference in my summer. I was participating in meaningful work and awesome personal and professional development. When it came down to where I would feel the most valued, participate in the most fulfilling experiences, and could make the most influence in the world, I could only think of John Deere. Plus, making quality products that influence our infrastructure and our food on a global scale brings me a certain sense of pride. I am always so proud to tell people, 'I work for John Deere!'” 
1. Brainstorm about what you want to do. Think about what skills you have that you could put to use on campus. Were you a lifeguard in high school? Consider working at your university's fitness center, staffing the indoor pool. Did you have a summer job as a barista? Try working at your campus coffee shop. Have you worked at a restaurant? Consider your college dining hall.

Required Job Qualifications: Graduation from a two or four-year accredited college or university with college level training in environmental science, chemistry, microbiology, water and wastewater or two years experience in an environmental laboratory. The equivalent combination of education and related work experience may be considered. A valid driver’s license is required.
Freshman seminar classes (like Statistics 101, for example) can have as many as 500 students enrolled. That's a lot of tests to grade, so professors often employ students within the department to grade tests. Although it's grunt work, the workload is generally spread out based on when the tests are, leaving lots of time in between for academics and extracurricular interests.
While it may seem like these sites are your best best when you’re a newcomer, they’re largely a crapshoot when it comes to winning a project. These sites are a rush for the lowest bid, and you’re competing against hundreds if not thousands of other desperate freelancers prepared to sell their firstborn for the chance to write someone’s 250-page ebook. (Some writers have been able to make a decent buck on sites like Upwork, but they are often the exception rather than the rule and have usually invested huge amounts of time to make it happen.)
Usability testers are asked to perform tests based on their demographic profile (education, knowledge of the web, age, social media use, etc.). They are then given questions to address and/or tasks to perform, such as registering on a website and then providing feedback online. Reviews usually take about 15-20 minutes and earn typically about $10 each. After completing a review, testers are not paid until the client accepts their feedback. Work can be rejected and unpaid for technical problems, lack of detail, or other issues the client determines. 
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