I have, as of yesterday, begun exploring the opportunity of writing for income. However, as writers go, I’m extremely confident in my abilities and I believe that as a writer I still not only write on an intellectual level on par with the best, I also FEEL my writing. Therefore, with no qualifications save my own, self-perceived ones, I say this: do not lose the spirit of writing looking too intensely at the writing itself.
In this post, I’m going to list the best online jobs that we’ve found. These are perfect jobs for travellers and some of them can earn a lot of money. Not all of them are passive or differed income by nature, but they all have the potential to earn you $1,000 or more per month. The best ones can earn upwards of $500,000 per year with little or no prior experience.

If you were not able to find luck with the list of jobs I have presented above, visit FlexJobs. This job site has been rated by the Better Business Bureau with an A+. They even provide a money-back guarantee in case you are not satisfied with how they deliver their service. FlexJobs assures that every single work posted is hand-screened to check its legitimacy. This is a fantastic method to find legit home-based jobs without the worries of handling scams.
“I love working for TTEC@home. I get to interact with and help others from the comfort of my own home. (Have you ever been in Houston traffic rush hour? That says it all!) Plus, they have some of the most amazing people I’ve ever had the privilege of working with. They aren’t just here to draw a paycheck. They truly care about their co-workers. I work many miles from the brick and mortar buildings, but I have a sense of security that my coworkers have my back and I’m not alone.”
"My favorite part of the Development Program are the rotations. The whole reason I went in to a Development Program vs. an entry level job was for the rotational aspect and being able to experience three completely different areas in Human resources within the short three years. With the different rotations come the variety of people you get to meet and discover their roles as well as what they love about John Deere."
A report in The New York Times today underlines college students’ increasing flexibility: Arizona State University, one of the nation’s largest schools with more than 40,000 students, is joining with edX, the massive open online course provider founded by M.I.T. and Harvard, to offer a freshman year curriculum that offers full university credit for a mere $200 a credit. Students only pay if they pass the courses and there is no admissions process, making college accessible to students with all sorts of jobs.

Whether you’re a stay-at-home mom who hasn’t done any office work in a while or you’re 18 and just started college, you may worry the work-at-home life isn’t for you. Not because you don’t have the time or the temperament. But because you’re worried you don’t have enough experience to land a work-from-home job or, if you do, that the work won’t be easy enough to slip in around a long day with the kids or all your classes.
As a freshman at UCLA, my 18-year-old son needs to make money. He’s very fortunate that I’m paying for his tuition, room, board and books but I’m not willing to shell out for his dues at Sigma Phi Epsilon, which I find shockingly high. It varies month to month but the April fee is $495, in part because the frat is throwing an expensive formal party. I’ve urged my son to apply for a campus job but those don’t pay all that well. For instance a “student assistant” in the science and engineering library makes just $9 an hour. Could he do better?
Who can resist the dinging sound of a new email? You, that’s who, especially if you want to stay on task. And forget about signing in to Facebook “just for a minute.” It’s easy to get distracted when you telecommute—unlikely distractions that just don’t exist at work abound at home. At the office, for example, you might visit the company kitchen once in the morning and once in the afternoon for a cup of joe (because that’s what’s appropriate), but at home, you’re hitting the fridge every hour on the hour. Or more.

“I love being a part of TTEC@home because of the flexibility of the schedule. There are way more benefits to working from home than most people realize. I save money on transportation and clothing. I save time. I have a tax write-off. And I have less anxiety. The bonus of working with TTEC is that I’ve met some great people and have learned new skills.”
Because the fee is so small but the task takes so little time, the strategy is to do as many of them as possible. However, be sure to read the fine print because many of these companies have a minimum payout, meaning that if you earn $8.55 doing 20 micro jobs, you may have to wait until you’ve earned as much as $50 to actually get your money. Read more about some of the pitfalls of this kind of work.
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