For many of us, to work from home is the ultimate indication of freedom. It means that you own both your time and your space, that your life is firmly within your control. Yet not every job can be done from afar. Some jobs, like being a pilot or a flight attendant, must be done from a certain place at a certain time, while others, like being a security consultant or a software developer, are extremely remote-friendly.
Who can resist the dinging sound of a new email? You, that’s who, especially if you want to stay on task. And forget about signing in to Facebook “just for a minute.” It’s easy to get distracted when you telecommute—unlikely distractions that just don’t exist at work abound at home. At the office, for example, you might visit the company kitchen once in the morning and once in the afternoon for a cup of joe (because that’s what’s appropriate), but at home, you’re hitting the fridge every hour on the hour. Or more.
Even if you’re brand-spanking new to the game, no one deserves a gig that pays one cent per word. And chances are if someone is looking for the sort of writer willing to write a word a cent, they’re not going to be the best client to work for. Don’t sell yourself short just because you’re new. Have a little patience, keep persevering, and you will find those clients who truly value you.
Are you a great listener? Good! That and solid typing skills are the basic requirements to becoming a transcriptionist online. Generally, you should type at least 60 WPM, and you should be able to type efficiently and accurately. While listening and typing is pretty easy work out of the gate, you will likely have a set of guidelines you need to follow to the letter. But once you get those guidelines down, you can settle in and let your fingers do the talking.
"I had a few different offers by the time I graduated, but I chose Deere because I would have not been able to forgive myself if I had passed this opportunity up. I was so impressed with the company when I did my internship at the Tractor Cab Assembly Operations facility in Waterloo, IA. The people were so nice and caring and the employee resource groups, especially NSBE (National Society of Black Engineers) really helped make a difference in my summer. I was participating in meaningful work and awesome personal and professional development. When it came down to where I would feel the most valued, participate in the most fulfilling experiences, and could make the most influence in the world, I could only think of John Deere. Plus, making quality products that influence our infrastructure and our food on a global scale brings me a certain sense of pride. I am always so proud to tell people, 'I work for John Deere!'” 
My girl came across this site, after I told her about losing a comment posting gig. I appreciate the time you took putting this together. I’ve been a part of the oDesk site for about 2 and a half years now, and I know all too well the struggle it is to get good paying work. oDesk is cool, but the foolishness that involves taking tests just so that you seem a little more proficient than the next person has always bugged me. I’ve been using oDesk as a starting point, and then convince my clients to move away so that we work together privately. My international clients hate all the extra fees. I’m really looking forward to trying the sites you mentioned, and once again Thanks for your time.
These little jobs are done by people who log on to a company’s site and choose tasks, which could be as simple as clicking a link. Amazon's Mechanical Turk is one of the most well-known sites of this type. Also, there are crowdsourcing projects, which are similar to data entry, where companies engage an army of virtual workers to each do one small part of a larger project.
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