If working as a researcher isn't feasible for you, considering being researched. It may seem a little strange, but research in fields such as sociology, psychology, neuroscience, linguistics, and behavioral biology requires study participants. Sometimes all you have to do is take a test or fill out a questionnaire. If you stop by those departments, you'll usually spot tons of flyers advertising paid opportunities.
Of course, there are opportunities for part-time work off-campus, too. Spend a little time digging for the right kind of part-time job, that leaves you with enough time to get your school work done. Also consider lining up an online job, part-time evening job or flexible gig where you can set your own schedule. You'll be able to up your earnings from the comfort of your dorm room or apartment.

When it comes to working as a part-time teacher or tutor, the options are endless. You can work at a nonprofit after-school program, tutor for a family near campus, or sign up for one of the new gig economy tutoring/teaching sites like Chegg Tutors, TakeLessons, Maestro, StudySoup, and Skillshare. The pay is usually high and the hours are often flexible.

What It Is: Think Mary Kay (cosmetics), Pampered Chef (kitchenware), or Rodan + Fields (skincare) — over time, you build a base of clients to whom you sell a company's wares. "There are several reasons why I decided to become a consultant," says Rodan + Fields independent consultant Debbie Royer. "I had seen how much of a blessing the business had been to a friend of mine and my sister-in-law. Plus, everything can be done from my phone, and being a mom to a preschooler and an infant I don't have a lot of extra time to be sitting at a computer."
I'm looking for a quality writer that can write e-books for me on a variety of non-fiction niches and topics. You must be able to effectively research the niche or topic that I give you and write me with a unique, 100% original quality book (3500-5000 words) that will help people. You must have good grammar and spelling as well. I'm willing to pay up to $1 per 100 words and am looking to build a long-term relationship with someone that can provide quality books for me quickly (within 7 days delivery). Please apply here with your proposed rates in your application, as well as a sample of your writing for me to review. less more
Thank you for this post. I just recently got into freelance writing and I feel so stupid already. I found a blog that suggested odesk so I signed up with them and since I didn’t have a portfolio yet I applied for a job paying $20 for 10 articles due in one week. I’m halfway done but after reading this I don’t even want to complete the rest. I feel so cheated. I thought it would be a good way to get some experience under my belt but I have put so much time and energy in the articles I have done so far and it doesn’t even seem worth it. Should I even complete the job?

Freelance writing is a writing career in which you work as an independent contractor, developing written communication for various clients. The client usually lays out specific objectives for a project. Your job is to meet those objectives by generating copy matching the tone and style that they want. Freelance writing is usually not about your creative expression as much as it is about writing in the voice your client desires. Your writing must be technically accurate as well since poor grammar and structure can detract from what your client is trying to say.
1. Brainstorm about what you want to do. Think about what skills you have that you could put to use on campus. Were you a lifeguard in high school? Consider working at your university's fitness center, staffing the indoor pool. Did you have a summer job as a barista? Try working at your campus coffee shop. Have you worked at a restaurant? Consider your college dining hall.

For many of us, to work from home is the ultimate indication of freedom. It means that you own both your time and your space, that your life is firmly within your control. Yet not every job can be done from afar. Some jobs, like being a pilot or a flight attendant, must be done from a certain place at a certain time, while others, like being a security consultant or a software developer, are extremely remote-friendly.

Who can resist the dinging sound of a new email? You, that’s who, especially if you want to stay on task. And forget about signing in to Facebook “just for a minute.” It’s easy to get distracted when you telecommute—unlikely distractions that just don’t exist at work abound at home. At the office, for example, you might visit the company kitchen once in the morning and once in the afternoon for a cup of joe (because that’s what’s appropriate), but at home, you’re hitting the fridge every hour on the hour. Or more.
4. Don't be afraid to ask, "How'd you get your job?" Make use of your peers. If you have any friends who work on campus, see if there are any openings at their workplaces, and if they can connect you with a manager or supervisor who would be willing to take a look at your resume. If you see an acquaintance working somewhere you'd like to work - like the campus Starbucks, for example, or in the dining hall - don't be afraid to ask if their workplace is hiring.
What Employees Say: “VIPKID pays between $14-22 an hour, plus more in incentives some months. Most kids are fun and well behaved. You create your own schedule and work as little or much as you want. The materials are already provided, you just have to review them beforehand and plan out how you want to teach the materials and which props you want to use.” —Current ESL Teacher
Have lots opinions on what works and what doesn't on the web? Then you might just be right for a "career" in remote usability testing. Actually, no one really makes a career at it, but user testers can pick up some extra work reviewing websites or mobile applications that may still be in development. You don't even necessarily have to be very knowledgeable about the Internet because some developers want the beginner's point of view.
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