What’s more, it’s time to get those list-making muscles in working order. Without face-to-face communication, it’s easy to let things slip through the cracks, so you’ll need to find ways to be as organized as possible. You might find that you like to write things down in a notebook, or perhaps you prefer calendar notifications. Find what works best for you to keep you organized and on task.
What It Is: Think Mary Kay (cosmetics), Pampered Chef (kitchenware), or Rodan + Fields (skincare) — over time, you build a base of clients to whom you sell a company's wares. "There are several reasons why I decided to become a consultant," says Rodan + Fields independent consultant Debbie Royer. "I had seen how much of a blessing the business had been to a friend of mine and my sister-in-law. Plus, everything can be done from my phone, and being a mom to a preschooler and an infant I don't have a lot of extra time to be sitting at a computer."
According to a new ranking put out by salary listings website PayScale, he can make more working off campus and possibly gain experience relevant to his career interests. The site has combed through its staggeringly huge database of 40 million salary reports (it adds 150,000 new salary records every month), and come up with a list of 10 jobs it recommends for college students. Some of them pay well and have flexible hours and others, like hospital orderly or tax preparer, offer hands-on experience in a student’s prospective profession like medicine or accounting. PayScale’s criteria: no bachelor’s degree required, less than three years of work experience needed, and fewer than 32 hours a week necessary. “Then we curated the list and used some editorial judgment,” says Lydia Frank, PayScale’s editorial and marketing director.
While it may seem like these sites are your best best when you’re a newcomer, they’re largely a crapshoot when it comes to winning a project. These sites are a rush for the lowest bid, and you’re competing against hundreds if not thousands of other desperate freelancers prepared to sell their firstborn for the chance to write someone’s 250-page ebook. (Some writers have been able to make a decent buck on sites like Upwork, but they are often the exception rather than the rule and have usually invested huge amounts of time to make it happen.)

These little jobs are done by people who log on to a company’s site and choose tasks, which could be as simple as clicking a link. Amazon's Mechanical Turk is one of the most well-known sites of this type. Also, there are crowdsourcing projects, which are similar to data entry, where companies engage an army of virtual workers to each do one small part of a larger project.

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