Write Jobs has the write stuff when it comes to branding its name. Write Jobs is a good place to look if you're interested in either telecommuting or you're in the market for more local clients. The design of the ​website may not be the most graphically-inspired but the site offers some real freelance writing gems on their list and is worth looking at from time to time. ​
Although very little data are available for this work-at-home job since it is relatively new, thousands of listings for social media managers can be found on sites like CareerBuilder.com, SimplyHired.com, and Upwork.com. If you have a demonstrated command of social media and a sizable following, you might even be able to get started by reaching out to companies directly and asking if they need help.
I am looking for native English speaking writers to write company profiles for various companies. Initially, you will be assigned one topic. After first article is approved, topics can be assigned in bulk. Practically an infinite stream of work awaits. Detailed instructions for structure and approach will be provided to shortlisted candidates. Pay rate is $5/ article. Typical article is ~1200 words. Bid $25 total for first 5 articles. TAT is 48 hours per article. less more
Don’t pay for opportunities: It is sometimes worth making investments in your online business – such as taking courses or paying for extra bids on freelance work platforms, but you should run a mile from anything that requires you to pay to work, such as survey sites that promise to offer lucrative opportunities but only if you pay for a subscription. With very few exceptions these are scams.
1. Brainstorm about what you want to do. Think about what skills you have that you could put to use on campus. Were you a lifeguard in high school? Consider working at your university's fitness center, staffing the indoor pool. Did you have a summer job as a barista? Try working at your campus coffee shop. Have you worked at a restaurant? Consider your college dining hall.
Get professional: Even if you’re only planning to do some surveys or microtasks, you’re still going to need to set up online accounts, save files and keep track of passwords. Make sure you’ve got all the necessary email accounts ready and that you have plans in place to organise your work. Going about this in a half-hearted way will never make you much money.
According to a new ranking put out by salary listings website PayScale, he can make more working off campus and possibly gain experience relevant to his career interests. The site has combed through its staggeringly huge database of 40 million salary reports (it adds 150,000 new salary records every month), and come up with a list of 10 jobs it recommends for college students. Some of them pay well and have flexible hours and others, like hospital orderly or tax preparer, offer hands-on experience in a student’s prospective profession like medicine or accounting. PayScale’s criteria: no bachelor’s degree required, less than three years of work experience needed, and fewer than 32 hours a week necessary. “Then we curated the list and used some editorial judgment,” says Lydia Frank, PayScale’s editorial and marketing director.

In this post, I’m going to list the best online jobs that we’ve found. These are perfect jobs for travellers and some of them can earn a lot of money. Not all of them are passive or differed income by nature, but they all have the potential to earn you $1,000 or more per month. The best ones can earn upwards of $500,000 per year with little or no prior experience.
The company will provide you with guidelines to use when evaluating search results, and tell you what keywords to search for results review. The pay can actually be decent for these jobs, but you’re still an independent contractor and how much work there is available varies. If this sounds like something you’d like to do, check out my post with everything you need to know. Then see if these companies are hiring:
Have lots opinions on what works and what doesn't on the web? Then you might just be right for a "career" in remote usability testing. Actually, no one really makes a career at it, but user testers can pick up some extra work reviewing websites or mobile applications that may still be in development. You don't even necessarily have to be very knowledgeable about the Internet because some developers want the beginner's point of view.
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