I am thankful for this site, thread and continued posts including yours. At present I am an IC with Textbroker International, and try to look at most the jobs as blessings in disguise. Generally, I am a better conversationalist since starting this in late September, agree with you about developing writing skills, and have kind of found my subject niche as it were. The big picture tells me I have it pretty good, given local opportunities and employment services for those of us who have a handicapability are inadequate in my place of residence. In a former profession I was under “supervision” before leaving and it was somewhat demeaning more than helpful. I hope your experience is dynamically different, but you sound quite capable and willing to improve where need be which says a lot favorably concerning what you bring to the proverbial table. All the best to you Denita, enjoyed the chance to talk shop!
As a freshman at UCLA, my 18-year-old son needs to make money. He’s very fortunate that I’m paying for his tuition, room, board and books but I’m not willing to shell out for his dues at Sigma Phi Epsilon, which I find shockingly high. It varies month to month but the April fee is $495, in part because the frat is throwing an expensive formal party. I’ve urged my son to apply for a campus job but those don’t pay all that well. For instance a “student assistant” in the science and engineering library makes just $9 an hour. Could he do better?
"I had a few different offers by the time I graduated, but I chose Deere because I would have not been able to forgive myself if I had passed this opportunity up. I was so impressed with the company when I did my internship at the Tractor Cab Assembly Operations facility in Waterloo, IA. The people were so nice and caring and the employee resource groups, especially NSBE (National Society of Black Engineers) really helped make a difference in my summer. I was participating in meaningful work and awesome personal and professional development. When it came down to where I would feel the most valued, participate in the most fulfilling experiences, and could make the most influence in the world, I could only think of John Deere. Plus, making quality products that influence our infrastructure and our food on a global scale brings me a certain sense of pride. I am always so proud to tell people, 'I work for John Deere!'” 
Because the fee is so small but the task takes so little time, the strategy is to do as many of them as possible. However, be sure to read the fine print because many of these companies have a minimum payout, meaning that if you earn $8.55 doing 20 micro jobs, you may have to wait until you’ve earned as much as $50 to actually get your money. Read more about some of the pitfalls of this kind of work.
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