For example, let’s say that your washing machine at home broke down and you need to fix it. Instead of calling the handyman to come, your husband decides he’s going to fix the machine. He ends up spending half a day figuring out the machine, and does eventually fix it. He did however have to make a trip to the tool shop to buy some extra tools and parts for the machine. Now, if you had called the handy man, it would probably have taken the handyman much less time, and he would have all the necessary tools and parts already, because that is his job. So in this instance, was your husband’s time and effort worth it? Oh, and because he took half the day fixing the machine, you now had to take over his duties of dropping the kids off at soccer and swim practice.
Although many medical transcriptionists work for hospitals or physician’s offices, most are able to work at home, and at a time or place of their choosing. Since their tasks involve transcribing recorded medical dictation, a computer, desk, and earpiece are generally the only requirements after completing a postsecondary medical transcriptionist program.
Some of the “gotcha” job offers from the past include check-cashing schemes, mystery shopping, medical billing “jobs” that require you to purchase expensive computer software, and craft-making jobs that ask you to pony up the cash for materials before you get started. And let’s not forget about the famous envelope-stuffing scam that was nothing more than a pyramid scheme designed to siphon money from as many people as possible.
Write Jobs has the write stuff when it comes to branding its name. Write Jobs is a good place to look if you're interested in either telecommuting or you're in the market for more local clients. The design of the ​website may not be the most graphically-inspired but the site offers some real freelance writing gems on their list and is worth looking at from time to time. ​
Many of my readers have started proofreading from their iPads, scanning legal documents for court reporters as a result of the Proofread Anywhere eCourse I recommend. You can read some of their testimonials in the comments on this post. They offer a 7-day intro course free so you can decide if that line of work is right for you before you pursue the training.
This is a job with much potential, in part because the title description covers many things. “You can fit your offerings to what you know how to do,” says Stephanie Foster, a former medical transcriptionist who runs the website HomeWithTheKids.com. One can own a virtual assistant business or work from home for a company that makes you available to other employers or clients. HomeWithTheKids.com, for example, currently features several such companies.

As a freshman at UCLA, my 18-year-old son needs to make money. He’s very fortunate that I’m paying for his tuition, room, board and books but I’m not willing to shell out for his dues at Sigma Phi Epsilon, which I find shockingly high. It varies month to month but the April fee is $495, in part because the frat is throwing an expensive formal party. I’ve urged my son to apply for a campus job but those don’t pay all that well. For instance a “student assistant” in the science and engineering library makes just $9 an hour. Could he do better?
One of the top job boards for telecommuting, FlexJobs enables you to create a custom job search profile to meet your specific needs. Select your categories (there are several under “Writing”), your preferred work schedule, your experience level and more to hone your search results down to those that best fit what you’re looking for. You can also set alerts so you’re notified when new jobs matching your search criteria are posted.
Many departments recruit paid research assistants. Not all research is in hard science, though. You may be able to find a job doing background research for English, history, psychology or sociology. While not all research assistantships are paid hourly, many come with a stipend. Either way, a position like this also gives you research skills to strengthen your resume.
1. Brainstorm about what you want to do. Think about what skills you have that you could put to use on campus. Were you a lifeguard in high school? Consider working at your university's fitness center, staffing the indoor pool. Did you have a summer job as a barista? Try working at your campus coffee shop. Have you worked at a restaurant? Consider your college dining hall.
The online application process for these jobs—or perhaps “gigs” is the better word, since they're all for independent contractors—is pretty simple and straightforward with very little required of candidates. Some of these opportunities—like the micro-jobs—you could very well apply and start the same day. And these jobs require very little commitment and can typically be done on your own schedule.
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