If you’re a college student looking for a job, the best place to start your job search is right on campus. There are tons of on-campus part-time job opportunities and, as a student, you’ll automatically be given hiring priority. Plus, on-campus jobs eliminate commuting time and can be a great way to connect with academic and professional resources at your university. Check with your school's career office or student employment office for help finding a campus job. If you receive financial aid, also check on jobs available through your campus work-study program.

If you’re looking for freelance writing jobs, we’ve put together this list of 99 publications that pay up to $4,000 / article. You could also check out FreelanceWritingGigs.com that constantly update their lists of websites that pay you to write. At first you might only make $20 – $50 per article, but as you grow your portfolio, you may be able to land higher paying jobs.


If you enjoy writing, you could earn six figures from the comfort of your home as a freelance writer. Freelance writing is like any other type of client-based creative work business. You need to develop your skills, build up a portfolio of your work, and find writing gigs. It can be lucrative but you won't be making a full-time income immediately – that takes time but it's certainly available.
Hi, not trying to being rude or anything, but if you’re planning a career in writing, you might want to check your spelling and/or grammar before putting it out there. Just saying…again, it trying to be rude or mean. I wish the best of luck to you! I too, am trying to get some writing gigs, and just starting out. I have no idea where to even begin. With that said, I think constructive criticism is a good thing, that if we take need to, can help us out in the long run. If anyone has any constructive criticism or constructive advice for me, please comment. Thank you!
Even if you’re brand-spanking new to the game, no one deserves a gig that pays one cent per word. And chances are if someone is looking for the sort of writer willing to write a word a cent, they’re not going to be the best client to work for. Don’t sell yourself short just because you’re new. Have a little patience, keep persevering, and you will find those clients who truly value you.
Even if you’re brand-spanking new to the game, no one deserves a gig that pays one cent per word. And chances are if someone is looking for the sort of writer willing to write a word a cent, they’re not going to be the best client to work for. Don’t sell yourself short just because you’re new. Have a little patience, keep persevering, and you will find those clients who truly value you.
Who can resist the dinging sound of a new email? You, that’s who, especially if you want to stay on task. And forget about signing in to Facebook “just for a minute.” It’s easy to get distracted when you telecommute—unlikely distractions that just don’t exist at work abound at home. At the office, for example, you might visit the company kitchen once in the morning and once in the afternoon for a cup of joe (because that’s what’s appropriate), but at home, you’re hitting the fridge every hour on the hour. Or more.
That’s why we’ve created our Beginner Blogging Course, which is filled with video tutorials, modules and useful advice for beginners. We also have a 200 page ebook to help new bloggers navigate the initial steps of blogging and we have a VIP Facebook Group. If you’re interested in starting a blog any time soon, simply click here and once you’ve signed up, you’ll receive our course, ebook and Facebook group access for free.
Spelt is definitely the way it is spelled and pronounced in Britain. My daughter reads and watches many British books, shows, and movies, and she spells and pronounces it that way because she has become so accustomed to it. She had one English teacher criticize her until she showed said teacher that it is the British way to spell it. She also says (and spells) “learnt” instead of “learned.” Being an Anglophile myself, I have no problem with it. It is not incorrect. Americans changed English. If anything, we’re the ones who mispronounce words!
Get professional: Even if you’re only planning to do some surveys or microtasks, you’re still going to need to set up online accounts, save files and keep track of passwords. Make sure you’ve got all the necessary email accounts ready and that you have plans in place to organise your work. Going about this in a half-hearted way will never make you much money.
Nick is the co-founder, editor and author of Goats On The Road. He contributes to numerous other media sites regularly and shares his knowledge of travel, online entrepreneurship and blogging with the world whenever he can. Nick’s advice has been featured on the Lonely Planet, CNN Money, Business Insider and Forbes and he spoke at the World Tourism Forum in Istanbul about the business of travel blogging.

Setting up a listing is a cinch. On Spot, you pin your parking space on the site’s map, snap a picture of it, establish your availability and rate (most sites will suggest a general estimate) and provide a payment method, like direct deposit or PayPal . When your spot gets rented, the site takes a commission of around 20%. And you’ve fattened your wallet by barely lifting a finger.


Please re write this letter. The intended audience are men 22 and 50 years old. All firefighters with high school to associate degree education. Google link https://docs.google.com/document/d/1H1lSS8mWaI0dDIDV2pDDPQ0jEVxnjZEKBMtQwqAE2Rk/edit?usp=drivesdk This job was posted from a mobile device, so please pardon any typos or any missing details. less more
Usability testers are asked to perform tests based on their demographic profile (education, knowledge of the web, age, social media use, etc.). They are then given questions to address and/or tasks to perform, such as registering on a website and then providing feedback online. Reviews usually take about 15-20 minutes and earn typically about $10 each. After completing a review, testers are not paid until the client accepts their feedback. Work can be rejected and unpaid for technical problems, lack of detail, or other issues the client determines. 
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