These are not get-rich-quick opportunities. You will need to work but the potential is there. As an example, the second one on our list is freelance writing. If you're a good writer, you can hit the ground running and earn hundreds of dollars to write once you find the right clients. If you're not a good writer, you may get paid less as you get better and find more clients. The potential is there but so is the work.
1. Brainstorm about what you want to do. Think about what skills you have that you could put to use on campus. Were you a lifeguard in high school? Consider working at your university's fitness center, staffing the indoor pool. Did you have a summer job as a barista? Try working at your campus coffee shop. Have you worked at a restaurant? Consider your college dining hall.

I am looking for an editor to edit short films, an episodic series and a small docu-series as well as other work. Not only will this be a consistent job, but will be a great way to consistently be adding things to your reel. Looking for this editor to mix sound and cut footage. If you can only do one, please let me know because you may still be considered. less more
Students enrolled in an art program can use their creative skills to design logos and graphics for various companies. You may be able to find a part-time position with a single company to provide graphic design services, but it’s also possible that you’ll be able to make more with a more flexible schedule if you contract your services out to several different companies at once. Upwork and Freelancer.com are great starting points for this type of job.
According to a new ranking put out by salary listings website PayScale, he can make more working off campus and possibly gain experience relevant to his career interests. The site has combed through its staggeringly huge database of 40 million salary reports (it adds 150,000 new salary records every month), and come up with a list of 10 jobs it recommends for college students. Some of them pay well and have flexible hours and others, like hospital orderly or tax preparer, offer hands-on experience in a student’s prospective profession like medicine or accounting. PayScale’s criteria: no bachelor’s degree required, less than three years of work experience needed, and fewer than 32 hours a week necessary. “Then we curated the list and used some editorial judgment,” says Lydia Frank, PayScale’s editorial and marketing director.
Call it what you want – remote work, digital nomadism, location independence – they all mean one thing: You learn how to make money online so that your job no longer ties you to a particular place. You no longer have to wake up early, get overly dressed up, get stuck in traffic, work too many hours, and earn too little. Online jobs offer an incredibly amount of flexibility, and while we love working abroad, you can do these online jobs from home if you choose. 
As a freshman at UCLA, my 18-year-old son needs to make money. He’s very fortunate that I’m paying for his tuition, room, board and books but I’m not willing to shell out for his dues at Sigma Phi Epsilon, which I find shockingly high. It varies month to month but the April fee is $495, in part because the frat is throwing an expensive formal party. I’ve urged my son to apply for a campus job but those don’t pay all that well. For instance a “student assistant” in the science and engineering library makes just $9 an hour. Could he do better?

It doesn’t take much for equipment to get started. Your home computer must be able to play audio files and most companies use transcription software that is available for free. Having a good set of computer headphones will help you better hear your audio files. Some positions additionally recommend a foot pedal which can help increase your production, but this can usually come later.
These little jobs are done by people who log on to a company’s site and choose tasks, which could be as simple as clicking a link. Amazon's Mechanical Turk is one of the most well-known sites of this type. Also, there are crowdsourcing projects, which are similar to data entry, where companies engage an army of virtual workers to each do one small part of a larger project.
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