As a freshman at UCLA, my 18-year-old son needs to make money. He’s very fortunate that I’m paying for his tuition, room, board and books but I’m not willing to shell out for his dues at Sigma Phi Epsilon, which I find shockingly high. It varies month to month but the April fee is $495, in part because the frat is throwing an expensive formal party. I’ve urged my son to apply for a campus job but those don’t pay all that well. For instance a “student assistant” in the science and engineering library makes just $9 an hour. Could he do better?


Many undergraduate and graduate students work part-time work study or non-work study jobs during their time at Tufts. These positions can help students refine their career interests, develop essential job skills, and earn some additional funds for books and personal expenses. We maintain a job listing for on-campus work study, on-campus non-work study, and off-campus part-time positions on Handshake, our Career Center’s recruiting platform.
When it comes to working as a part-time teacher or tutor, the options are endless. You can work at a nonprofit after-school program, tutor for a family near campus, or sign up for one of the new gig economy tutoring/teaching sites like Chegg Tutors, TakeLessons, Maestro, StudySoup, and Skillshare. The pay is usually high and the hours are often flexible.

GlassDoor estimates that teachers at Tutor earn $9 to $14 an hour. “Depending on the subject mix and number of hours you work, you could make between a few hundred to a few thousand dollars per month,” Farrar says. Chegg’s rates start at $20 per hour, estimating that tutors can make up to $1,000 a month. WyzAnt’s rates run $24 to $36 per hour, according to GlassDoor.
My girl came across this site, after I told her about losing a comment posting gig. I appreciate the time you took putting this together. I’ve been a part of the oDesk site for about 2 and a half years now, and I know all too well the struggle it is to get good paying work. oDesk is cool, but the foolishness that involves taking tests just so that you seem a little more proficient than the next person has always bugged me. I’ve been using oDesk as a starting point, and then convince my clients to move away so that we work together privately. My international clients hate all the extra fees. I’m really looking forward to trying the sites you mentioned, and once again Thanks for your time.
With a record number of open positions in the job market today, economists say now is the perfect time for job-seekers to not only negotiate the perks and benefits they want, but also their pay. To see what jobs are offering the work-from-home flexibility that many professionals desire, as well as a high salary, FlexJobs created this list of remote positions that pay $100,000 or more.

1. Brainstorm about what you want to do. Think about what skills you have that you could put to use on campus. Were you a lifeguard in high school? Consider working at your university's fitness center, staffing the indoor pool. Did you have a summer job as a barista? Try working at your campus coffee shop. Have you worked at a restaurant? Consider your college dining hall.
Don’t pay for opportunities: It is sometimes worth making investments in your online business – such as taking courses or paying for extra bids on freelance work platforms, but you should run a mile from anything that requires you to pay to work, such as survey sites that promise to offer lucrative opportunities but only if you pay for a subscription. With very few exceptions these are scams.
Find the best remote writing jobs here. Are you passionate about writing on a specific topic? Do you work well with a variety of clients and under tight deadlines? You may be the right fit for remote writing job. Remote writers are frequently hired for freelance or contract positions, but there are often positions available for full-time remote writers.

When it comes to working as a part-time teacher or tutor, the options are endless. You can work at a nonprofit after-school program, tutor for a family near campus, or sign up for one of the new gig economy tutoring/teaching sites like Chegg Tutors, TakeLessons, Maestro, StudySoup, and Skillshare. The pay is usually high and the hours are often flexible.


Whatever you do, when first out of college, it can take a long time to build up your experience. It can be a long, frustrating climb, but do have patience and try not to get frustrated when you keep hearing that you need experience to get the job. It really, truly is character-building and most of us (whose dad doesn’t own the company!) have to go through it. Best of luck!
In conclusion, please note that survey sites are another great source for extra cash paid regularly. There aren't exactly online jobs that pay weekly, but you can only get paid as often as you have money pending. Even though the cash out threshold is low on these, you won't be able to cash out if you aren't getting survey invites and qualifying into the surveys. But if you have money in your account, the potential is there to get the money almost as soon as you need it.
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