I am thankful for this site, thread and continued posts including yours. At present I am an IC with Textbroker International, and try to look at most the jobs as blessings in disguise. Generally, I am a better conversationalist since starting this in late September, agree with you about developing writing skills, and have kind of found my subject niche as it were. The big picture tells me I have it pretty good, given local opportunities and employment services for those of us who have a handicapability are inadequate in my place of residence. In a former profession I was under “supervision” before leaving and it was somewhat demeaning more than helpful. I hope your experience is dynamically different, but you sound quite capable and willing to improve where need be which says a lot favorably concerning what you bring to the proverbial table. All the best to you Denita, enjoyed the chance to talk shop!
Spelt is definitely the way it is spelled and pronounced in Britain. My daughter reads and watches many British books, shows, and movies, and she spells and pronounces it that way because she has become so accustomed to it. She had one English teacher criticize her until she showed said teacher that it is the British way to spell it. She also says (and spells) “learnt” instead of “learned.” Being an Anglophile myself, I have no problem with it. It is not incorrect. Americans changed English. If anything, we’re the ones who mispronounce words!
A word of caution: Remember that where very little is required, very little is offered. These jobs don’t pay much, and they are not going to provide a reference for your resume. It may take working at several different of these online jobs to pull in the income you want. And as always, know the signs of a work-at-home scam as you sort through the opportunities.
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