It can be difficult to balance school with a work schedule, and that balance is even harder to come by when you factor in the commute to and from work. Jobs on campus, therefore, tend to be a really good fit for college students. For one, on-campus employers tend to be more understanding about academic demands, and are used to accommodating staffing changes based on fluctuations in course load. In addition, you won't have to worry about scrambling from class in order to make it to work on time, and working on campus is a great way to meet new people. You’ll also make valuable connections with faculty and staff at your university. 
I am looking for an editor to edit short films, an episodic series and a small docu-series as well as other work. Not only will this be a consistent job, but will be a great way to consistently be adding things to your reel. Looking for this editor to mix sound and cut footage. If you can only do one, please let me know because you may still be considered.
9. Think long-term. Not all on-campus jobs are easy to come by, but if you put in the right amount of planning and effort, you might be able to land yourself a stellar position. For example, although the hiring process to become a resident assistant in a dormitory is an extended one, the perks (free housing, for example) are enormous. Keep your eyes and ears open for these types of opportunities.
Yet there are plenty of companies you’ve probably never heard of, too. Appen, which tops the list, develops high-quality training data for machine learning and artificial intelligence; not surprisingly, they’re hiring web search evaluators and a slew of linguists in lesser known languages like Sudanese Arabic and Xhosa. BCD Travel, the Dutch managed travel provider, is hiring remotely for their customer service, business development and travel consultant roles. Three universities—Grand Canyon, Western Governors and Walden—make the list as well. To say there’s an abundance of work from home jobs available out there would be an understatement. For most people, there are more than they could ever imagine.
Required Job Qualifications: Graduation from a two or four-year accredited college or university with college level training in environmental science, chemistry, microbiology, water and wastewater or two years experience in an environmental laboratory. The equivalent combination of education and related work experience may be considered. A valid driver’s license is required.
Something else I recommend is taking the free 7-lesson mini-course on general transcription offered by Janet Shaughnessy of Transcribe Anywhere. This will help you to understand if you're a good fit for a transcription career, what you can potentially earn, and also where to get started. Janet also has free legal transcription mini-course if you're more interested in going that route.
Even if you’re brand-spanking new to the game, no one deserves a gig that pays one cent per word. And chances are if someone is looking for the sort of writer willing to write a word a cent, they’re not going to be the best client to work for. Don’t sell yourself short just because you’re new. Have a little patience, keep persevering, and you will find those clients who truly value you.
Work at home transferring data from one source to another. Most of these companies do not require past experience, although with few exceptions the pay may not be enough to consider it a stable income. Before you begin applying to any of the companies below (many of which sadly are almost never hiring), you might want to read the post I wrote about data entry jobs from home. It explains what your expectations should be prior to pursuing a career in this industry.
Required Job Qualifications: Completion of high school and experience performing manual labor, including the use of tools and equipment used in maintenance, repair, or construction of water and/or sewer lines. Knowledge of pipefitting and plumbing is required. The equivalent combination of education, training and related work experience may be considered.
This particular work-at-home opportunity takes a little more work experience in general than the other four on this list, but it pays better too. Search engine evaluators examine Internet search results and give feedback as to whether they are accurate, relevant, and spam-free. To do this, the evaluator must be knowledgeable about current culture and the Internet, with good communication skills. Sometimes a college degree is required or preferred, but direct experience as a search evaluator is usually not.
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