Even better, the national median wage for web developers was $66,130 in 2016, with the top 10% earning an average of $119,550. And you typically don’t need an advanced degree to begin working in this field. All you need is some postsecondary education, applicable experience, and a portfolio of successful sites you’ve built and managed. There are even intensive coding boot camps designed to teach programming skills in just a few short months.
Ugh! Sheverley I was also rejected by Upwork…twice! And I have felt so disheartened over the last few days trawling through the dreadful propositions on Freelancer and Guru…truly nothing more than slave labour, and when I look at the profiles of the so-called Writers my jaw drops as they don’t seem to have even a rudimentary grasp of the English language. It seems quite obvious to me that most of those profiles are fake. Not that the “job” propositions are worded any better! In fact many of the jobs are clearly students getting someone else to write their research papers for them. Surely this is NOT okay?! This article is awesome – and I’ve read plenty! Thank you Elna. I will keep the dream alive and pursue ALL of the above.
I am building a website and an app to allow people in a community to dynamically carpool and will need someone to help with the contents. English isn't my first language, however I do write it quite well. I will work with the writer on each step of the development to get to the objective as quick as possible by providing him or her any information needed on a timely manner. All content in the app as well as content for the website will be done by whoever is hired. However, what I need right now is just a few pages for the prototype. The full website development will ensue as ideas get validated. Prices can be negotiated along the development.

These are not get-rich-quick opportunities. You will need to work but the potential is there. As an example, the second one on our list is freelance writing. If you're a good writer, you can hit the ground running and earn hundreds of dollars to write once you find the right clients. If you're not a good writer, you may get paid less as you get better and find more clients. The potential is there but so is the work.


Pretty much every serious blogger and online entrepreneur I know has at least one virtual assistant. Think of a VA like an administrative assistant at a regular office building, except they are working remotely. Duties can include practically any administrative task you can think of – including handling emails, bookkeeping, completing sales, customer service, editing websites, and much more. Specializations in areas like social media management or online ad management is another option.

Editor of Splashpress Media, Noemi used to be an English teacher before going freelance full-time. She has a penchant for words and likes to play around with them - the result of a lifetime of burying her nose in books. Having been bitten by the travel bug, she aims to discover more languages & places in the near future as she continues to do what she loves most - writing.


You may hear this term a lot in the business or corporate world; it’s an effective way for managers to distribute (or sometimes avoid!) work. But, that’s not what I’m referring to. Instead, delegation means leveraging time from an outside source to give you opportunities to increase your quality time. By outside source, we simply mean that it’s not your own time that you’re spending.
Like virtual assistants, proofreaders can find jobs with almost any business that publishes content online. They provide a second set of eyes for publishers, and can help them create content that looks more polished and professional. Those with specialized skills, like transcript proofreading, can also find work proofreading transcripts for court reporters.
What an informative and fun article. While I’ve been writing for years, I’ve never had the courage to venture out because I haven’t got a degree, and feel very intimidated by a lack of formal education. But, when I say I’ve been writing for years, I mean I have been asked by everyone to write almost everything…including breakup up letters, condolence cards to the family of a murder victim, return texts in the middle of a text-fight (those are fun) and even an anonymous letter to a woman who’s best friend spotted her husband with another woman. (Not fun.) I’ve written proposal letters for house-hunters, eulogies, on and on and on….and I love it. I’ll write anything (within my knowledge base) and be happy doing so. Finally, after my last request from a long ago former coworker, to write a plea to Salvation Army for assistance, I decided to try to finally do what I love and learn to profit from it.

I actually DID write a PULSE piece on LinkedIn, about how I dropped the idea of Outsource ( http://www.linkedin.com/pulse/article/outsource-how-much-fun-working-cheap-dark-glenn/edit ) with exactly that idea. The race to the bottom with pay to plays and such, simply isn’t worth doing. It might be that *somebody* is making $$ on those sites, but example of person wanting *150 original* descriptions for some sort of fragrant oils on a budget of less than $500 is more often where those places go.

With that said, bloggers can expect to make a few hundred dollars a month up to tens of thousands. A blogger’s salary completely depends on their niche, their audience, and how skilled they are at promoting either their own products or somebody else’s. For example, while she is certainly at the top of the heap, our good friend Michelle makes about $50,000 a month from blog revenue alone.
Bookmarking this blog post. I just started writing guest posts for a client and I get few bucks for it. The article is 600 t o1500 words that pay 3$ to 10$ which I think is an unreasonable price. I wanted to earn more so I should start paying attention more in writing. I would love to earn and learn more in freelancing jobs such as this because I’m also a mom.
Like most work-at-home jobs, the amount of money you make depends on your experience level and any specialties you may have. According to Salary.com, annual salaries for technical support representatives range from roughly $29,600 to $43,300 with a median salary of $34,400 a year. That breaks down to about $16.50 an hour, but again this figure varies widely.

I just discovered your blog and want to say how right on you are about the above. I’ve reached a dead end with freelance writing and after reading some of your posts, I have learned some of the reasons why, like not having an online presence for example! You’re also absolutely right about bidding sites (which was in another post). I’ve tried them before and they weren’t helpful. Anywho, I wanted to ask about #10. It seems like a great tip! But am wondering how open the web design companies are to providing writers with a list of people in need of web content? I definitely want to try this out.


Completing surveys is similar to microworking in many ways – it’s good to sign up with more than one service, and it’s wise to keep an active eye on new incoming surveys so you can grab them before anyone else can. There’s also the added benefit that completing surveys really doesn’t feel like work – it’s a pretty mindless thing you can do whilst semi-concentrating on something else. If you’re handy with your computer, you can usually blast through them a little quicker than expected too.

Online tutors are needed for a wide variety of subjects. Some jobs require you to tutor high school or college students in what can be considered “standard” subjects. Other tutoring jobs, like Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL), require interaction and instruction with students from around the globe. These types of positions are more specialized and may require additional training.


Facebook is the most obvious place to start. Create a page for your product or brand, invite all your contacts to join and come up with a contest with free giveaways. This way you will spread the word about your product and get your first fan base. You can also add a shop to your Facebook page or join Facebook Marketplace that enables buying and selling right in the app.
With Superprof, it has never been easier to advertise your tutoring services. Whether you're a student looking for tutoring jobs or a professional exploring alternative jobs for teachers, Superprof can cater for everyone. Earn a great living and be your own boss. Offer home-tuition locally, or start giving online tutoring to thousands of potential students all over the globe. Everyone has a skill to teach, so join Superprof, become a private tutor and share your passion!
Usability testers are asked to perform tests based on their demographic profile (education, knowledge of the web, age, social media use, etc.). They are then given questions to address and/or tasks to perform, such as registering on a website and then providing feedback online. Reviews usually take about 15-20 minutes and earn typically about $10 each. After completing a review, testers are not paid until the client accepts their feedback. Work can be rejected and unpaid for technical problems, lack of detail, or other issues the client determines. 
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