It’s funny because I find myself editing books that I am reading, ALL of the time!!! I wonder how these people got their jobs as editors, when I, the measly reader, can pick them out so quickly, without even trying and it drives me CRAZY to feel like I have to proofread books that I am paying over $20 a book for! I have so many stories and poetry and even a couple of novels that I have written or started writing and I always joke that when I die, someone will find my writing and only then, will I get famous for my writing. I, as the writer, would never turn something in, to have it read by anyone, without proofreading it myself either. I also want to remind everyone that often times, when we are just writing a comment, we may often accidentally hit the wrong key and submit our comments, without proofreading what we have written… it doesn’t necessarily make anyone unintelligent… thank you for a lot of good info on here
Have lots opinions on what works and what doesn't on the web? Then you might just be right for a "career" in remote usability testing. Actually, no one really makes a career at it, but user testers can pick up some extra work reviewing websites or mobile applications that may still be in development. You don't even necessarily have to be very knowledgeable about the Internet because some developers want the beginner's point of view.
Are you a great listener? Good! That and solid typing skills are the basic requirements to becoming a transcriptionist online. Generally, you should type at least 60 WPM, and you should be able to type efficiently and accurately. While listening and typing is pretty easy work out of the gate, you will likely have a set of guidelines you need to follow to the letter. But once you get those guidelines down, you can settle in and let your fingers do the talking.
This past year has been a roller coaster ride for me. I want to give freelance writing a try. I did get accepted to a content mill site, but the jobs on there go so fast I can never get a chance to grab one to work on. 🙁 I do not have a portfolio and I’ve never made one. I also do not blog anymore. So, how can I get into freelance writing? How do I build up a portfolio or show my writing? Free hosting is all I can do now, and I’m sure that is going to be a turn off to a client. Any tips would be great. Thanks.

To get hired, you fill out an application and take an exam to test your knowledge. “If you pass, you go through a mock session with an experienced tutor who assumes the role of student and evaluates your creativity, empathy and teaching skills,” says Cindy Hamen Farrar, Ph.D., senior director of academic tutoring at Tutor. “We look for people who know their subject matter and who can break it down and communicate effectively.”


It should be that simple…and 30-40+ years ago it was. We’d see “right” spelled as “write” and “peeled” spelled as “pealed” and know instantly what was intended. Unfortunately, it’s been my experience that errors in every type of writing…ads, serious magazine and book writing, the news that crawls across the TV screen, etc….are so common that it’s as though everyone thinks they’re being paid to make errors.
[Job Description] Seeking an experienced writer to ghostwrite romance books about 20,000-35,000 words as well as a captivating description which will really entice romance readers. I will provide themes, keywords, details to be included as well as full plots in some cases. In other cases the writer will have to develop full story and well developed plot and characters independently. Books will need to be publish ready, fully edited and proofread. [Requirements] - Must be an experienced writer within the Paranormal & Shifter Romance genre. - Native English speakers with excellent spelling, grammar, and punctuation only. - Content will need to be very CREATIVE, HIGH QUALITY, and 100% ORIGINAL. - Available to discuss requirements through a live call in the Upwork Messages chat room. As a ghostwriter, I will retain all copyrights and your name will not appear anywhere on the work. (This is a contractual agreement that will need to be signed and returned). [Benefits] - Looking to establish a longterm relationship with a writer who will receive regular work over the longterm. - Creative license to pitch ideas and write the stories you love. Please include your per word compensation requirements, a couple of samples of your work in the genre, your favorite author to read, and favorite genre to write. I'm looking forward to hearing from you! less more
Greg Johnson is a personal finance and frugal travel expert who leveraged his online business to quit his 9-5 job, spend more time with his family, and travel the world. With his wife Holly, Greg co-owns two websites – Club Thrifty and Travel Blue Book. The couple has also co-authored a book, Zero Down Your Debt: Reclaim Your Income and Build a Life You'll Love. Find him on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter @ClubThrifty.
Hi, not trying to being rude or anything, but if you’re planning a career in writing, you might want to check your spelling and/or grammar before putting it out there. Just saying…again, it trying to be rude or mean. I wish the best of luck to you! I too, am trying to get some writing gigs, and just starting out. I have no idea where to even begin. With that said, I think constructive criticism is a good thing, that if we take need to, can help us out in the long run. If anyone has any constructive criticism or constructive advice for me, please comment. Thank you!
I worked as a freelance academic writer for about 5 years and Uvocorp was one of the 7-8 sites I worked with. I totally agree with Norbert. Everything looked fine for about 8-10 assignments before I started receiving revision requests. I had them review their comments and remove fines for the first two revision requests. However, I just gave up when I got the next seemingly senseless plagiarism remark. I was not sure if it was unintentional from their part, but I felt annoyed and disappointed by then.
Hey Elna, thanks for all the advice and jam-packing this article with so many resources! Thanks for asking what I plan to do to start finding jobs! I’ve shared your article on FB while letting my friends and family know my endeavors and joined a few writer groups. I even cold pitched to my client today whom I’ll be catering a private event for! I plan to make use of all the tutorials and online courses you shared to learn me into a high paid freelance writer and will start free guest posting on blogs asap, peruse the job board sites and start making pitches. Right now I’m networking with other experienced freelance writers ;)!

Haven’t much advice to give you on blogging – except join as many writers’ forums at LInked In, if you haven’t done yet. You see, I am more comfortable in writing articles than blogs. I have heard (from joining a lot of LI writing forums) – of a lot of successful/well-paid bloggers there who might be able to help you – to name a few – Francesca Nicasio, a US-based Filipina blogger, Carol Tice (US), Bamidele Omnibalusi (Africa), and more.


Think long and hard before shelling out any money: Some work-at-home jobs will require you to purchase materials or equipment to get started, and while that doesn’t mean they’re not legitimate, it should be a red flag. If you are asked to pay for equipment, make sure you understand what you’re buying, and from whom. Also ask about the return policy for your equipment if your new gig doesn’t work out.
“I love working for TTEC@home, I’m a single parent who moved to a new state where I had no family or friends. I started a job where I felt like I was working just to pay daycare for my four-year-old son. My son hated the daycare and I never had time to spend with him. I was referred to TTEC and I'm in love with it. Now, I put my son on the bus and log in for work. By the time I get off work, my son is almost home. It’s wonderful!”
For example, let’s say that your washing machine at home broke down and you need to fix it. Instead of calling the handyman to come, your husband decides he’s going to fix the machine. He ends up spending half a day figuring out the machine, and does eventually fix it. He did however have to make a trip to the tool shop to buy some extra tools and parts for the machine. Now, if you had called the handy man, it would probably have taken the handyman much less time, and he would have all the necessary tools and parts already, because that is his job. So in this instance, was your husband’s time and effort worth it? Oh, and because he took half the day fixing the machine, you now had to take over his duties of dropping the kids off at soccer and swim practice.
You’re welcome! So happy you found this post helpful for you living in the UK! For me, I was a stay at home mom so I didn’t work at that time. I was a bit bored with the day-to-day of taking care of twins…you know diaper changes a million times a day, and cleaning up messes just as much. I needed a creative outlet so I explored work at home stuff online and my husband told me about freelance writing and being a virtual assistant. I immediately gravitated towards writing!
Ugh! Sheverley I was also rejected by Upwork…twice! And I have felt so disheartened over the last few days trawling through the dreadful propositions on Freelancer and Guru…truly nothing more than slave labour, and when I look at the profiles of the so-called Writers my jaw drops as they don’t seem to have even a rudimentary grasp of the English language. It seems quite obvious to me that most of those profiles are fake. Not that the “job” propositions are worded any better! In fact many of the jobs are clearly students getting someone else to write their research papers for them. Surely this is NOT okay?! This article is awesome – and I’ve read plenty! Thank you Elna. I will keep the dream alive and pursue ALL of the above.
SO happy I found this blog! I’m the owner of a brand spankin’ new MA in Literature, but can’t find a company I’m excited about for full-time work (and I can’t move…boyfriend’s work visa and all…), so I’ve started looking into freelance! It scares the hell out of me, but I’m motivated and you’ve given some great starting points and advice! Wish me luck!
I vehemently disagree with you here. Content mills horribly abuse writers and make it difficult for people who have spent years in this field to get a fair wage due to the expectation that companies can pay less to get more. Also, writers who start out here often get stuck in a rut and can’t evolve past the oDesk stage. All around bad news and not recommended for anyone who wants an actual career in writing.
What’s more, it’s time to get those list-making muscles in working order. Without face-to-face communication, it’s easy to let things slip through the cracks, so you’ll need to find ways to be as organized as possible. You might find that you like to write things down in a notebook, or perhaps you prefer calendar notifications. Find what works best for you to keep you organized and on task.

Setting up a listing is a cinch. On Spot, you pin your parking space on the site’s map, snap a picture of it, establish your availability and rate (most sites will suggest a general estimate) and provide a payment method, like direct deposit or PayPal . When your spot gets rented, the site takes a commission of around 20%. And you’ve fattened your wallet by barely lifting a finger.

The directory is broken up into category by type of work from home job, and when you click the link to visit a category, you'll see lists of companies that hire for work from home — some of which have been reviewed on the main blog and some which have not. If the company has been reviewed here, you'll see a link that takes you to the review. Each listing also has a little bit of information about the company next to it.
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