I am looking for an excellent and experienced blog writer who also must love cats to write for my company's blog on an ongoing basis. We are a pet sitting company that caters exclusively to cats in the San Francisco Bay area (www.comfortedkitty.com). I am looking to have fresh and unique content that helps increase our business visibility in our service areas, especially those we are struggling to gain clients because they simply don't know that our company exists and gladly serves their area. And of course to give helpful information to prospective customers. Obviously content needs to center around cat-oriented topics. So someone very knowledgeable with cats is preferred in order to supplement my knowledge and ideas for blog topics. less more
Hello, I'm looking for help with tutoring my sons to help along their communication skills. They were born premature and are coming alone slowly as far as ABC, 123, colors, shapes and writing. They are 2 and 3 going on 3 and 4. The father and I work most of the time, and try when we can, but would like a little more help. Also we will fund trips to museums, and other informational festivities that you may have in mind! please be mindful of price range.
How to Get It: Check out K12 (K12.com) and Connections Academy (ConnectionsAcademy.com). Both organizations offer various benefits — including health insurance, retirement savings accounts and paid time off — depending on where you live. As in any job where you work with kids, there will be a background and reference check as well as interviews. You may also need to be licensed to teach in the state where the students reside.
With that said, there are certainly a few tricks to getting your foot in the door. Our friend Kayla’s new course called “$10K VA” teaches you the exact steps she has used to make a consistent $10,000 a month. She covers topics like pitching clients, creating efficient systems, pricing your services, and more. It’s a great opportunity to hit the ground running by learning from one of the best VAs around. Learn more about the $10K VA course here.
I worked as a freelance academic writer for about 5 years and Uvocorp was one of the 7-8 sites I worked with. I totally agree with Norbert. Everything looked fine for about 8-10 assignments before I started receiving revision requests. I had them review their comments and remove fines for the first two revision requests. However, I just gave up when I got the next seemingly senseless plagiarism remark. I was not sure if it was unintentional from their part, but I felt annoyed and disappointed by then.
I just discovered your blog and want to say how right on you are about the above. I’ve reached a dead end with freelance writing and after reading some of your posts, I have learned some of the reasons why, like not having an online presence for example! You’re also absolutely right about bidding sites (which was in another post). I’ve tried them before and they weren’t helpful. Anywho, I wanted to ask about #10. It seems like a great tip! But am wondering how open the web design companies are to providing writers with a list of people in need of web content? I definitely want to try this out.
Thanks so much for this amazing list. I am new to the “leap off the bridge” mindset that is doing freelance writing for a living. I have made my living in the past in management and small business ownership (aftermarket automotive parts store, a NAPA to be precise). I have a BA in Sociology and I have also worked in non-profit management and social work but my dream has always been to write. So after selling the business I decided to follow my dream of being a writer. I have done some blogging and have a novel I’m working on along with a few academic papers that were published while in college. I also have written curriculum for young adults that was published by a Christian publisher some years ago. However, even with some marginal knowledge about writing for a living, I found the amount of information out there to be overwhelming and much of it is people simply promoting scams or trying to sell you on their program. Your post is a breath of fresh air compared to much of the other “content” out there about freelancing. Thank you for taking the time to share
Whatever you do, when first out of college, it can take a long time to build up your experience. It can be a long, frustrating climb, but do have patience and try not to get frustrated when you keep hearing that you need experience to get the job. It really, truly is character-building and most of us (whose dad doesn’t own the company!) have to go through it. Best of luck!

At Superprof, we offer more than 1000 subjects across dozens of categories (sports/ academia/hobbies/music/etc.). You don’t necessarily have to be a qualified tutor to be an effective educator. For example, a professional pianist is obviously qualified to give piano lessons but teaching involves much more than certification. It requires passion; love for your craft, enthusiasm and the ability to foster these attributes in your students. A piano teacher does not necessarily have to be a concert pianist, but they must have good ideas on how to become one and how to master the instrument and the music.

Thanks a lot for the article. Am a journalist by profession. I was writing for major print newspapers in Kenya East Africa plus online news agencies before I moved and settled in the US in Seattle together with my family. I haven’t written since 2014. Your article comes at the appropriate time for me since I have been looking for ways to break into fulltime freelance; copy writing, web content, editing and proofing. Back in Kenya I was writing about climate change, environment, agriculture and other related topics. Now I want more of a niche area and that is why I will look at your course to start. Thank you.
When I started to work from home, I missed talking to people. A lot. But I soon found a friend. Every day, I would hear the UPS guy gunning his motor as he drove down my long driveway to deliver my packages. As soon as I would spot him, I’d fly out of the house and chat him up. And now he leaves the packages by the curb. Sure, the one big bonus of working from home is that it gets you away from the petty office politics and never-ending gossip.

What It Is: Create virtual displays of art and graphics by assembling images, typographies, and motion graphics for published, printed, or digital media. This may include drafting logos, packaging, labels, and advertisements for brands. Top candidates will have skills in creativity, typography, software, web design, Adobe Photoshop, technology, and more.

I vehemently disagree with you here. Content mills horribly abuse writers and make it difficult for people who have spent years in this field to get a fair wage due to the expectation that companies can pay less to get more. Also, writers who start out here often get stuck in a rut and can’t evolve past the oDesk stage. All around bad news and not recommended for anyone who wants an actual career in writing.
Thank you for this informative blog. This indeed enlightened a writer like me to be extra cautious as to what sites to visit. I have been writing as freelancer for barely a year now. Lately, I have been hired by a private client through a website not included in the ones you have mentioned. In just 5 days, I have written 22 articles/blogs for her but unfortunately, I was not paid. Worst, she became inactive on skype and on the site where we both are members. What disheartened me more was that I have found some of my blogs already posted online on different sites. Coming across this blog, I now have several options as to what sites to visit and what to do as well. Thanks again. By the way, I am a stay-at-home mom too.
For example, if you type in “banana bread recipe,” search engines should pull up recipes from major sites first. Posts from smaller blogs or recipes for other, related dishes—like zucchini bread—should fall toward the end of the list. As a search engine evaluator, you’ll be asked to enter specific words or phrases into a search engine, then assess how appropriate and informative the sites it pulls up are.
Usability testers are asked to perform tests based on their demographic profile (education, knowledge of the web, age, social media use, etc.). They are then given questions to address and/or tasks to perform, such as registering on a website and then providing feedback online. Reviews usually take about 15-20 minutes and earn typically about $10 each. After completing a review, testers are not paid until the client accepts their feedback. Work can be rejected and unpaid for technical problems, lack of detail, or other issues the client determines. 
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