Currently I’m working full time at a daycare and I’m trying to transition into writing freelance. It would be so amazing for so many reasons. Two reasons being writing is my passion and starting college I’m going to need a more flexible work schedule. My first question is do you think I’ll be able to, starting out at least, work nights? I can’t answer emails or calls at work because I work with children and I work long hours. Will companies want to work with me if I’m only available at night?
What It Is: Many companies pay online testers to make sure websites are intuitive and easy to navigate. "You basically follow the instructions you're given to check out the website," says Anna Thurman, founder of RealWaysToEarnMoneyOnline.com, a site that has reviewed more than 500 online work opportunities. "It usually only takes about 15 minutes per test." Thurman recommends registering with 10 to 12 different companies since the opportunities to test these sites are doled out first come, first served. "There are people who make $100 to $200 a month by staying on top of those tests," Thurman says.
One of the top job boards for telecommuting, FlexJobs enables you to create a custom job search profile to meet your specific needs. Select your categories (there are several under “Writing”), your preferred work schedule, your experience level and more to hone your search results down to those that best fit what you’re looking for. You can also set alerts so you’re notified when new jobs matching your search criteria are posted.
I am a first year student at college, and while I’ve always loved writing, I’ve been wondering whether I have the skills to work in freelance writing. I just got out of high school last year, and while I can write essays for school, I don’t know how I would transition to doing freelance writing work, especially since the type of writing required is so different. My main concern is that right now my writing might not be “good” enough. I don’t have any sample content to show clients, aside from academic essays. What tips would you have for starting out?
Holly fell into freelance writing on a whim. She submitted several pitches for guest posts and ended up landing a few clients. After roughly 6 months of freelancing on the side, she was making enough money to replace her income and work at home full-time. Now, she makes over $200,000 a year from writing alone. Not bad for a home-based business, eh?
“I love working for TTEC@home, I’m a single parent who moved to a new state where I had no family or friends. I started a job where I felt like I was working just to pay daycare for my four-year-old son. My son hated the daycare and I never had time to spend with him. I was referred to TTEC and I'm in love with it. Now, I put my son on the bus and log in for work. By the time I get off work, my son is almost home. It’s wonderful!”
10. Working Solutions – Working Solutions periodically offers work that involves data entry. In order to work with them, you’ll need to fill out an online application and follow it up with taking some assessments. They’ll contact you afterward – their website says this step can take up to 2 weeks – with acceptance or rejection. Once you’re an agent, you will have the opportunity to review and put yourself forward for programs you think match your skills. Each program pays differently, and payment is made either via direct deposit or mailed check.

That’s not to say that blogging isn’t a real work-from-home option. I personally know dozens of people who make more than six figures a year from their blog, including my own family. In fact, I’d highly encourage you to start a blog if you feel inclined. Eventually, it can be a great source of residual income. Just don’t go into it thinking you’re going to make a ton of money right out of the gate.
6. The Smart Crowd – The Smart Crowd is part of Lionbridge, providing their registered workers a pool of available microtasks – many of which revolve around data entry. You work when you want and as much as you want. Pay rates vary and are advertised both as competitive and corresponding to your productivity. To work with them, register on their site for free: they evaluate you and then match you with tasks that fit your skills. Payment is issued once a month.
“I love working for TTEC@home. I get to interact with and help others from the comfort of my own home. (Have you ever been in Houston traffic rush hour? That says it all!) Plus, they have some of the most amazing people I’ve ever had the privilege of working with. They aren’t just here to draw a paycheck. They truly care about their co-workers. I work many miles from the brick and mortar buildings, but I have a sense of security that my coworkers have my back and I’m not alone.”
Thanks for this list. It is really helpful. I recently decided to try freelance writing, and I was accepted for an online writing gig site. This acceptance has boosted my confidence to much. Just to know they liked my writing sample and said yes means a lot to me. Now, I am sure I can apply anywhere, and even if it is a no from others, I still have my yes to hold on to that keeps me going. Great post.
That’s not to say that blogging isn’t a real work-from-home option. I personally know dozens of people who make more than six figures a year from their blog, including my own family. In fact, I’d highly encourage you to start a blog if you feel inclined. Eventually, it can be a great source of residual income. Just don’t go into it thinking you’re going to make a ton of money right out of the gate.
I’ve been rigorously studying freelancing for a while now (I plan on getting started after school ends in the first week of April) and I have to say your bog has been very helpful, especially this post. I thought cold mailing and job boards were the only places to find freelance writing job, and that it would be quite tough finding a job given the competition, but after going through this list, I think finding a job would be easier.
Well-fed freelance writers stay out of “content farms” and bidding sites, where you compete with hundreds of other writers for the same projects and get the gig if you under-quote yourself enough. To be a well-fed freelance writer, you need to go out there and market yourself to your target audience – usually, marketing managers – like any other business owner.
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