While you don’t necessarily need much experience to become a researcher, earning the best pay comes from specializing in an area you have some expertise in. And while you may find the research easy, know that you will likely have a set of guidelines to follow. Get the details on my Get Paid to Be A Know-It-All post, and see if the following are hiring:
Tutor.com is an equal opportunity employer. All hiring decisions are subject to immigration laws pertaining to work authorization requirements. Tutor.com considers applicants for all positions without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, gender, age, marital status, disability, veteran status, sexual orientation or any other characteristic protected by applicable local, state, or federal law.
On their own websites, bloggers make money by selling their own products or advertising others. Advertising revenue is generated through advertisements, sponsorships, or affiliate marketing. In addition to their own blogs, many bloggers look for online writing jobs. Freelance writing provides a steadier stream of income than blogging, and it is easier to start making money quickly – making it a great way to supplement your income as you grow your own blog.
But even if you don’t burrow down into copywriting, freelance writing is definitely worth another look. If you’re able to type fast, you should be able put together a decent blog post in about an hour (once you get the hang of it, which typically doesn’t take very long). If you charge a client $50 for that blog post (which is a pretty typical beginner/advanced beginner rate), you’ve just made $50 for an hour’s worth of work. And the best part is, many businesses will want to hire a writer for recurring work, so it’s not like you have to find a new client every time you want an assignment.

Hi Elna, I just bumped into this post when I was just beginning to give up because finding freelance writing tasks that pay well has been the hardest task. I have been stuck with content mills for the longest time (I started freelance writing sometime in 2011), I have written tonnes of articles for very little pay usually $7 for 500 words. I look forward to revitalizing my writing career with ideas you shared. I’m taking up the challenge to find better paying gigs.

Currently I am in high school and working a part time job, I probably only work an estimated 8 hours a week though. I have been longing to be a writer for quite some time, I’ve been wanting to be a freelance writer but sadly, most of the sites that pay you require a credit or debit card and I do not own one. Is there any freelance writing jobs that would possibly pay me in cash or something along those lines?
Companies these days are expanding their office boundaries to incorporate the idea of working from home. These work from home companies offer employees flexible working hours, better pay and freedom from office walls. Even though the internet is flooded with many online jobs, there are some that offer better pay. Here is a list of work from home firms that are willing to pay $16 per hour or more for home-based jobs.

What Employees Say: “The money is uncapped, and you’re honestly in the driver seat of your bonus. This is the best (and easiest) incentive package I’ve ever had in the work field! There are also so many other perks that come with the job such as great benefits, fun culture, and TONS of room for growth. Amex really does believe in you!!.” —Current Employee
7. SigTrack – SigTrack works with independent contractors to record whether petition signers are voters or to process voter registration and other forms. Since this work revolves around the petition season, they only hire at certain times. Pay is per work unit based on accuracy, and they require that you maintain at least 98% accuracy to satisfy your contract and also peer review others’ work. They pay via PayPal. This position is only available to U.S. citizens and you’ll be required to do a short Skype call during the interview process to establish identity. Equipment requirements are pretty standard, but note that they require dual monitors.

Thank you for this post. I just recently got into freelance writing and I feel so stupid already. I found a blog that suggested odesk so I signed up with them and since I didn’t have a portfolio yet I applied for a job paying $20 for 10 articles due in one week. I’m halfway done but after reading this I don’t even want to complete the rest. I feel so cheated. I thought it would be a good way to get some experience under my belt but I have put so much time and energy in the articles I have done so far and it doesn’t even seem worth it. Should I even complete the job?
For example, let’s say that your washing machine at home broke down and you need to fix it. Instead of calling the handyman to come, your husband decides he’s going to fix the machine. He ends up spending half a day figuring out the machine, and does eventually fix it. He did however have to make a trip to the tool shop to buy some extra tools and parts for the machine. Now, if you had called the handy man, it would probably have taken the handyman much less time, and he would have all the necessary tools and parts already, because that is his job. So in this instance, was your husband’s time and effort worth it? Oh, and because he took half the day fixing the machine, you now had to take over his duties of dropping the kids off at soccer and swim practice.
Also, I personally have a membership to FlexJobs. It's $14.95 a month, but you get access to carefully curated, guaranteed scam-free work from home job leads. It's not for everyone, but I've overall been impressed with the site. It may be worth signing up for a month just to see if you think it will benefit you in your job search. Canceling is very easy if you don't think it's for you.
Your article is helpful, and I plan to try some of these. Over the last couple years I’ve inadvertently picked up some writing jobs by good fortune that have paid .30 – .50/word, but writing was always a sideline. Now I want to do more of it – but searches are yielding abysmal and depressing results. My content is rarely and minimally edited (by professional editors)and I turn it in on time with solid grammar and syntax. I’ve been looking and finding gigs at .01/word or less. No wonder so much of the writing I read on the web is crap, including articles written by those who don’t know the difference between “less” and “fewer.” I hope your tips will help me find some quality gigs. After all, my name is attached to it even if there’s no byline.
This is my foot in the door and I’m following some of your other tips in order to get myself out there even more. I’m an introvert, so this is new and difficult for me. I have questioned myself countless times and am feeling a bit impatient, but I’m trying to trust the process and take it one day at a time. The warmth and encouragement that come through in your writing have helped keep me going. Thank you Elna!

That’s great you want to start freelance writing! I hope your husband is on board with this 🙂 As for your blog topic, remember that your personal niche is different than your freelance writing niche. I blog over at TwinsMommy.com and that’s my passion and personal niche. I talk about being a work at home mom, working at home, having twins and making money blogging. But this blog is geared towards writers. For you though, you can pick your paying niche (freelance writing niche) and pick a personal niche (this can be a lifestyle niche where you blog about several topics). So let’s say you pick the pet industry as your paying niche, then your writer website would reflect copy for a Pet Writer for hire. Then you can have your lifestyle blog if you want and blog about pet life, motorcycles, personal growth etc.. Make sense? You can also have a writer website that’s all about pet writing, have a portfolio with pet writing and then link to your lifestyle blog. This is what I do for my writer website. I link to THIS blog on my writer website even though it has nothing to do with my niche (digital marketing). Make sense?
While you’re doing that networking, check out the Jobs section and sign up for email alerts when jobs are posted that match your interests. Many will be location-based, but who’s to say you can’t approach these employers with a proposal for freelance writing services? Maybe they need someone to fill the gap in the hiring interim, or maybe the job could just as easily be done remotely but they hadn’t considered that.

Of course, FlexJobs is not the only site for finding remote work and jobs you can do from home. Upwork is the largest marketplace for freelancers in the world, with demand for nearly any remote-friendly skill set. Then there are the niche sites, like We Work Remotely, where the majority of job posters are early stage startups looking for talented engineers. Still, FlexJobs may be the winner: its robust, easy-to-navigate system offers tens of thousands of jobs from thousands of employers at any one time. If you’re serious about finding remote work you can do from home or on the road, there’s no better place to look.
Thanks for sharing your story. Even though you want to be more creative, if you want to get paid for your writing as a freelance writer, you need to realize this is a business. I would rely – in the beginning – with what you are good at and have expertise in. This, for you, is health and exercise science. I would form my freelance writing business around creating health content for a client. From there you need to figure you our ideal client. This post may help you out: https://elnacain.com/blog/ideal-freelance-writing-client/ From there you can hone your copy on your writer website to attract that right client as well as market your business!
Hi Elna. Great post. I’ve been a freelance writer, and digital nomad for three years now. I, unfortunately, started out on one of the writing mills that pays very little. I made quite a bit on there, but eventually left as I was writing 8-10 hours a day for next to nothing. I’ve tried a number of your suggestions and the one I’ve had the most luck with, by far, was cold contacting. I’ll contact 10-12 websites a day and send them a sample of my work. I get a few new clients a week, plus all of my repeat customers. It’s gotten to the point I need junior writers to pick up some of the slack. For anyone out there interested in being a freelance writer there’s plenty of work out there.

Teaching is not just about passing on your knowledge; it is also about building a bond of trust with your students. Showing your human side is very important. Showing that you’re an interesting and thoughtful person, willing and capable of listening to others. Mention your hobbies, groups you’re part of, your travels, your past work experience, and successes in life.
My girl came across this site, after I told her about losing a comment posting gig. I appreciate the time you took putting this together. I’ve been a part of the oDesk site for about 2 and a half years now, and I know all too well the struggle it is to get good paying work. oDesk is cool, but the foolishness that involves taking tests just so that you seem a little more proficient than the next person has always bugged me. I’ve been using oDesk as a starting point, and then convince my clients to move away so that we work together privately. My international clients hate all the extra fees. I’m really looking forward to trying the sites you mentioned, and once again Thanks for your time.
Being an at-home call-center rep requires a computer and may require specific software or equipment. A great phone voice helps as well, as does any experience in customer service, data entry, retail sales, or management. Dozens of sites list job openings for call-center representatives, including Upwork.com, Freelancer.com, and SimplyHired.com. However, you may also find listings offered by local businesses in your local newspaper.
Hi Elna! Thank you for the insightful post! I am just starting out with freelancing and your article has provided a lot of useful informations! I have one question though; in order to sign up as a freelancer in websites such as Upwork or other related sites, do you have to be a US citizen? (Because I am not!) If yes, does that mean you can only apply for freelancing jobs in your own country? I hope to hear from you soon!

Hey, Elna! I appreciate your input more than you can imagine. I graduated with a BFA in Creative Writing for Entertainment, and while my focus is mainly writing scripts for film and commercials, I also blog. (Mostly for my own entertainment.) Still, it’s good to know there are ways to get going. Believe me, I’ve tried. But being a graduate with two kids and no hubby makes the task a bit daunting when I’m a “lone pilot.” Thanks again for your inspiration.

Thanks so much for this amazing list. I am new to the “leap off the bridge” mindset that is doing freelance writing for a living. I have made my living in the past in management and small business ownership (aftermarket automotive parts store, a NAPA to be precise). I have a BA in Sociology and I have also worked in non-profit management and social work but my dream has always been to write. So after selling the business I decided to follow my dream of being a writer. I have done some blogging and have a novel I’m working on along with a few academic papers that were published while in college. I also have written curriculum for young adults that was published by a Christian publisher some years ago. However, even with some marginal knowledge about writing for a living, I found the amount of information out there to be overwhelming and much of it is people simply promoting scams or trying to sell you on their program. Your post is a breath of fresh air compared to much of the other “content” out there about freelancing. Thank you for taking the time to share


The directory is broken up into category by type of work from home job, and when you click the link to visit a category, you'll see lists of companies that hire for work from home — some of which have been reviewed on the main blog and some which have not. If the company has been reviewed here, you'll see a link that takes you to the review. Each listing also has a little bit of information about the company next to it.
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