I am about to be 30 and never really learned basic math skills. I had trouble learning the material in school and teachers just passed me along to the next grade level, so I just fell more behind each year. I'm looking for someone who can show me basic math as a refresher and then focus on multiplication and division. Getting my GED is my main goal.
This is awesome!, I never thought of myself looking for “Freelance Writing” articles and tips but I just got laid off (truck driving), and it just happens that I purchased a book that it teaches about “How to fully fund your own worry-free retirement starting at any age”, well, in one of its pages it says that freelance writing is one of the several and a good way to retirement.
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What It Is: Transcription essentially involves you listening to audio files and typing out what you hear. Easy enough, right? Companies usually hire transcriptionists without much experience, so some job postings might only require you to have a computer and keyboard to get started. Transcription jobs can vary from transcribing a college lecture to a doctor's medical dictation, while most companies allow you to make your own schedule.

Something else I recommend is taking the free 7-lesson mini-course on general transcription offered by Janet Shaughnessy of Transcribe Anywhere. This will help you to understand if you're a good fit for a transcription career, what you can potentially earn, and also where to get started. Janet also has free legal transcription mini-course if you're more interested in going that route.

I recently came across some of your posts after searching for new ways to find and pitch freelance writing clients. While I’ve been working as a freelancer for a few years now, it never hurts to look for ways to expand my business. There’s a lot of crap out there on the Web that offers the same old suggestions for locating writing clients (usually accompanied by a heavy sales pitch to sign up for an expensive workshop). This article offered fresh ideas and unique details about the standard job sources–I was really impressed! Thank you! I am going to put some of these ideas into my business plan this month.
This post has been SO helpful! I love it! Thank you for all your insightful tips and tricks! I am currently in the process of starting up my own website for blogging, and when I learned about freelance writing I knew I had to try it out! So I just have one question for you, would you suggest having a blog while freelance writing? Maybe as a way to provide a little extra work for clients to refer to as sample work from me? I was originally going to blog and go the advertising route to provide an income off the blog, but freelance writing seems much more interesting to me.

I have been interested in writing extensively since a very young age, writing either poetry, novels, short stories etc. Eventually I ended up in the corporate sector writing business plans, marketing plans and various other corporate documents. But freelance writing has been in my blood, just never really had the inspiration to follow this dream of mine. I will apply your guidelines and intend to forge a new career path in freelance writing. I don’t think it would be a problem that I am living in South Africa since the internet has created a global community…
It’s fairly easy to build your own website if you take advantage of the many free learning opportunities online. However, much of the population isn’t equipped to build their own site, or doesn’t have the time, which is why so many people make a living building websites and blogs for others. According to the BLS, around 16% of web developers were self-employed in 2016, with the vast majority able to work at home, or anywhere with a laptop and speedy Internet connection.

Usability testers are asked to perform tests based on their demographic profile (education, knowledge of the web, age, social media use, etc.). They are then given questions to address and/or tasks to perform, such as registering on a website and then providing feedback online. Reviews usually take about 15-20 minutes and earn typically about $10 each. After completing a review, testers are not paid until the client accepts their feedback. Work can be rejected and unpaid for technical problems, lack of detail, or other issues the client determines. 
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