The great news is, there are viable alternatives that fit most if not all of these criteria, and the pay is substantially better than data entry. They might require a tiny bit of brainpower and the faster you can type, the better you’ll do — but neither of these should be hurdles that are big enough to stop you from pursuing your work-at-home dreams.
I think you have the potential to be a freelance writer. I would start a blog or create samples on Medium or LinkedIn. Start writing posts that you want to get paid for. So finding a niche like business writing, digital marketing writing, parenting, gardening etc.. and then creating content around that. Then finding the clients that want that content! Good luck!

BizScript SEO is looking for some creative web content writers to join our team! MUST HAVES: -Strong knowledge of SEO and SEM -Strong writing and grammatical skills -Knowledgeable on WordPress -Is okay with helping upkeep our blog by posting one article a week on SEO or SEM -Very responsible and has GREAT time management skills Being a start-up, we are looking for freelancers with adjustable, low rates but who are interested in helping our business grow. We aren't looking for freelancers that just want to do one project. We want to form an on-going relationship with you and allow you to be part of our team. As of right now, we will only require your for 5 to 10 hours a week. less more


Fiverr is a huge freelance services marketplace where you can offer practically any online service. It started with folks doing gigs for just $5, hence the name, but you are no longer restricted to charging just $5 per job. You start by listing your Gigs, which you fit into one of their many categories, and immediately can start selling. The categories include everything from Graphics & Design to Writing to Video to Music to Programming. It really spans the spectrum.
If you enjoy writing and have great grammar skills, this one’s an easy online job for sure – all it takes is time. One of the best parts of building your online career on writing is setting your own rates and choosing what you want to write about. Or even what type of writing you want to do – you can write grant proposals, nonfiction articles, and manuals or you can ghostwrite books or blog posts. You can even get creative and write fiction or start your own blog.

I thoroughly enjoyed the article and am waiting for my husband to get off work to discuss taking your course. I have been struggling to find the next step in my career and I keep leaving my job searches to research free lance writing instead. I have always loved writing creatively and journaling, and I think I’m ready to really jump into this for a career.


About applying to UVOCORP, I must say, stay away from that company. I’ve been working as a Freelance writer ever since online outsourcing came to being. I encountered that company once when I am looking for other academic writing companies. But the experience is just horrible. They will have you started on a couple of assignments, and approve them right on the spot, but don’t get too excited. Once they see that you already has a few dollars on your earnings, the support sharks will flood you with multiple revisions with corresponding monetary penalties. The first and second revisions are ok, but after running your work on plagiarism checker hundreds of times and proof-reading for grammar mistakes thousands of time. They will still ask you to revise something and dissolve your earnings through penalties one after another. explaining things will not do you justice either, they wouldn’t even care what you say, they will just send your work for revision and ask for ridiculous changes that were not part of the original instructions.
Hey, Elna! I appreciate your input more than you can imagine. I graduated with a BFA in Creative Writing for Entertainment, and while my focus is mainly writing scripts for film and commercials, I also blog. (Mostly for my own entertainment.) Still, it’s good to know there are ways to get going. Believe me, I’ve tried. But being a graduate with two kids and no hubby makes the task a bit daunting when I’m a “lone pilot.” Thanks again for your inspiration.
I actually DID write a PULSE piece on LinkedIn, about how I dropped the idea of Outsource ( http://www.linkedin.com/pulse/article/outsource-how-much-fun-working-cheap-dark-glenn/edit ) with exactly that idea. The race to the bottom with pay to plays and such, simply isn’t worth doing. It might be that *somebody* is making $$ on those sites, but example of person wanting *150 original* descriptions for some sort of fragrant oils on a budget of less than $500 is more often where those places go.
Get professional: Even if you’re only planning to do some surveys or microtasks, you’re still going to need to set up online accounts, save files and keep track of passwords. Make sure you’ve got all the necessary email accounts ready and that you have plans in place to organise your work. Going about this in a half-hearted way will never make you much money.

Also keep in mind that communication with a telecommuting team requires an extra layer of crystal clear clarity. Since almost everything is done via email (and there are no facial or body clues to read), you’ll need to make sure that you mean what you, um, type. I’ve found that shorter, more succinct sentences go a lot farther than long-winded soliloquies.
Thanks so much! Yes I like warm pitching, but sometimes I have better success just using job boards. I’m a bit impatient 🙂 and have a million things on my plate so when I can, I’ll do some warm pitching. I’m finding for me, the best chance of my landing work is via referrals. Once you have those awesome clients, there’s a goldmine more clients and more money!
As usual another great post, I didn’t know there where so many places that newbies can find work. That is a great list and I will be putting them to work very soon, or as soon as I finish your course. I may be contacting you soon to look over your shoulders as you are teaching us from your great course “Write Your Way To Your First 1K”. I can’t praise it enough, keep up the good work Elna.
Thanks a lot for the article. Am a journalist by profession. I was writing for major print newspapers in Kenya East Africa plus online news agencies before I moved and settled in the US in Seattle together with my family. I haven’t written since 2014. Your article comes at the appropriate time for me since I have been looking for ways to break into fulltime freelance; copy writing, web content, editing and proofing. Back in Kenya I was writing about climate change, environment, agriculture and other related topics. Now I want more of a niche area and that is why I will look at your course to start. Thank you.
Try to avoid technical terms difficult to comprehend. Also avoid bland or cliché phrases that do not detail what you will provide. For example, do not just say “I teach maths at all levels and for all abilities", mention the exact levels at which you teach (GCSE, A-level, Gmat, Sats, college etc.) as well as the exact topics (algebra, trigonometry, geometry, calculus, etc.)
I just love this list, my husband was none too happy when he found out that I had paid 100 dollars to an online scam…. So getting frustrated and just about giving up hope on getting a job for home I ran across this…. I was just wondering if there happened to be anymore job opportunities now since it has been a couple of years…. I have three children and I want to afford their extracurricular activities such as baseball and gymnastics… I don’t want to get a job that would keep me from taking them to practice and or games so I have been trying the online job search and as I have mentioned its basically one scam after the next…. I just really want to make it a little more easier on my husband since he is working so hard and going to school so our children and I can have a good life. So to make it easier I want to work from home and help some with bills without the cost of childcare and just putting more stress on him… We don’t have a lot of money as it is…
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