Thank you for this info. I have twelve tumors and most are on my back. I want to work and need my children to see that I am still able to bring something to the table. This disease is inherited and they both have it. I have State insurance so I have little hope of getting the help I need. I don’t let them know that but am constantly pushing them to get a career that has good insurance and one that will take them to unimaginable places with insurance lol. I needed this article it has gave me hope. Thank you and God bless. P.s. if you have more info plz email me. I am open to any ideas you might havee.

Some of the “gotcha” job offers from the past include check-cashing schemes, mystery shopping, medical billing “jobs” that require you to purchase expensive computer software, and craft-making jobs that ask you to pony up the cash for materials before you get started. And let’s not forget about the famous envelope-stuffing scam that was nothing more than a pyramid scheme designed to siphon money from as many people as possible.

Your article is helpful, and I plan to try some of these. Over the last couple years I’ve inadvertently picked up some writing jobs by good fortune that have paid .30 – .50/word, but writing was always a sideline. Now I want to do more of it – but searches are yielding abysmal and depressing results. My content is rarely and minimally edited (by professional editors)and I turn it in on time with solid grammar and syntax. I’ve been looking and finding gigs at .01/word or less. No wonder so much of the writing I read on the web is crap, including articles written by those who don’t know the difference between “less” and “fewer.” I hope your tips will help me find some quality gigs. After all, my name is attached to it even if there’s no byline.
But once you’re in your home office—alone, every day—you might start to miss that collegial camaraderie. Since the UPS incident, I’ve reached out more to colleagues via IM and will post cute pics of my new puppy for my colleagues to see on Yammer. And when we’re on deadline, we even (gasp!) talk on the phone. It’s helped tremendously to make the disconnect not feel so severe. It’s a good balance between having peace and quiet when you need it and much-needed interaction with others, too.
I need someone to pick up my 4th grader after school (Monday through Thursday each week) from the neighborhood school, bring her home, and work with her on improving her reading skills, completing homework assignments, practicing for spelling or other tests, etc., until my husband and I get home from work between 5:30 or so. On Friday afternoons, rather than pick up the 4th grader, I need you to come to the house to sort, wash, dry and fold our laundry. * My 4th grader is often eager to please, but on occasion (like if she needs a snack), she can be a bit of a challenge. She loves sports and singing and dancing so a willingness to entertain little study breaks is a must. * My 8th grader may need a little help in pre-AP classes. * Our last tutor/assistant's class schedule next spring conflicts with the times we need her. :(
While this is not technically “at home,” you can still earn great money without ever getting on the phone using your personal car, bike, or scooter to deliver food, give people rides, and even picking up groceries. The great thing about these companies is that it's also very flexible work. No one is telling you when to start and stop. You just do as much work as you can, when you can.
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I actually DID write a PULSE piece on LinkedIn, about how I dropped the idea of Outsource ( http://www.linkedin.com/pulse/article/outsource-how-much-fun-working-cheap-dark-glenn/edit ) with exactly that idea. The race to the bottom with pay to plays and such, simply isn’t worth doing. It might be that *somebody* is making $$ on those sites, but example of person wanting *150 original* descriptions for some sort of fragrant oils on a budget of less than $500 is more often where those places go.

Usability testers are asked to perform tests based on their demographic profile (education, knowledge of the web, age, social media use, etc.). They are then given questions to address and/or tasks to perform, such as registering on a website and then providing feedback online. Reviews usually take about 15-20 minutes and earn typically about $10 each. After completing a review, testers are not paid until the client accepts their feedback. Work can be rejected and unpaid for technical problems, lack of detail, or other issues the client determines. 
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