How to Get It: You can apply directly through companies, such as Stella & Dot, a jewelry company that had over $100 million in sales in 2010, who is always in need of stylists. A few others include Avon (household and personal care), The Cocoa Exchange (chocolates and more), and Alice's Table (flowers). You can also visit the Direct Selling Association website — all the companies listed there agree to abide by a code of ethics, so they only offer legitimate opportunities. Typically reps make a small investment to get started (this is a legitimate and standard practice), and sometimes pay a fee for the merchandise being sold. After that you can work as much or as little as you want, and see profit based on how much you sell.
What It Is: Think Mary Kay (cosmetics), Pampered Chef (kitchenware), or Rodan + Fields (skincare) — over time, you build a base of clients to whom you sell a company's wares. "There are several reasons why I decided to become a consultant," says Rodan + Fields independent consultant Debbie Royer. "I had seen how much of a blessing the business had been to a friend of mine and my sister-in-law. Plus, everything can be done from my phone, and being a mom to a preschooler and an infant I don't have a lot of extra time to be sitting at a computer."
I am building a website and an app to allow people in a community to dynamically carpool and will need someone to help with the contents. English isn't my first language, however I do write it quite well. I will work with the writer on each step of the development to get to the objective as quick as possible by providing him or her any information needed on a timely manner. All content in the app as well as content for the website will be done by whoever is hired. However, what I need right now is just a few pages for the prototype. The full website development will ensue as ideas get validated. Prices can be negotiated along the development. less more
Thank you so much Elna for these 20 tips. I am new to freelance writing and have recently read Writer For Hire: 101 Secrets to Freelance Success by Kelly James-Enger, and would recommend it to anyone, but was still feeling that I needed more. A quick google search led me to this blog post of yours which has given me the extra boost I needed. Many of my ‘How do I get started?’ questions have been answered. I am taking one of your free courses and am planning on taking your ‘Write To 1K’ course very soon. The price for your course is very reasonable and I can’t wait to start. A quick scan of your blog has assured me that I have found a goldmine of resources and I want to thank you again for taking the time to share your learning curve and your experience with us all.

I just wanted to let you know that I have been hired by Maritz (Thank you Annie) and working with them for almost 30 days now (perfect attendance gets you a $.25 raise after 30 days too). The company has us calling customers from different businesses (banks, insurance co. etc..) and asking them to please complete a survey of how their customer service experience was between 1 (poor) and 10 (excellent). They pay you the minimum wage of your state weekly by direct deposit and pay on time. The staff is great and helpful and they make the job easy and enjoyable. Thanks again Annie and bless you for all your great and helpful information that you share with us.


Hi Elna. Great post. I’ve been a freelance writer, and digital nomad for three years now. I, unfortunately, started out on one of the writing mills that pays very little. I made quite a bit on there, but eventually left as I was writing 8-10 hours a day for next to nothing. I’ve tried a number of your suggestions and the one I’ve had the most luck with, by far, was cold contacting. I’ll contact 10-12 websites a day and send them a sample of my work. I get a few new clients a week, plus all of my repeat customers. It’s gotten to the point I need junior writers to pick up some of the slack. For anyone out there interested in being a freelance writer there’s plenty of work out there.


It’s fairly easy to build your own website if you take advantage of the many free learning opportunities online. However, much of the population isn’t equipped to build their own site, or doesn’t have the time, which is why so many people make a living building websites and blogs for others. According to the BLS, around 16% of web developers were self-employed in 2016, with the vast majority able to work at home, or anywhere with a laptop and speedy Internet connection.

Holly fell into freelance writing on a whim. She submitted several pitches for guest posts and ended up landing a few clients. After roughly 6 months of freelancing on the side, she was making enough money to replace her income and work at home full-time. Now, she makes over $200,000 a year from writing alone. Not bad for a home-based business, eh?

I am a first year student at college, and while I’ve always loved writing, I’ve been wondering whether I have the skills to work in freelance writing. I just got out of high school last year, and while I can write essays for school, I don’t know how I would transition to doing freelance writing work, especially since the type of writing required is so different. My main concern is that right now my writing might not be “good” enough. I don’t have any sample content to show clients, aside from academic essays. What tips would you have for starting out?
Thank you for this post. I just recently got into freelance writing and I feel so stupid already. I found a blog that suggested odesk so I signed up with them and since I didn’t have a portfolio yet I applied for a job paying $20 for 10 articles due in one week. I’m halfway done but after reading this I don’t even want to complete the rest. I feel so cheated. I thought it would be a good way to get some experience under my belt but I have put so much time and energy in the articles I have done so far and it doesn’t even seem worth it. Should I even complete the job?
I am building a website and an app to allow people in a community to dynamically carpool and will need someone to help with the contents. English isn't my first language, however I do write it quite well. I will work with the writer on each step of the development to get to the objective as quick as possible by providing him or her any information needed on a timely manner. All content in the app as well as content for the website will be done by whoever is hired. However, what I need right now is just a few pages for the prototype. The full website development will ensue as ideas get validated. Prices can be negotiated along the development. less more
One of the top job boards for telecommuting, FlexJobs enables you to create a custom job search profile to meet your specific needs. Select your categories (there are several under “Writing”), your preferred work schedule, your experience level and more to hone your search results down to those that best fit what you’re looking for. You can also set alerts so you’re notified when new jobs matching your search criteria are posted.
Hi Elna! Thoroughly enjoyed this delightful, informative article. I am a full time paralegal with a B.A. in Journalism. I’m about 5 years away from retirement…and would like to shift from full time paralegal work to freelance writing. I’ve been writing a column (“Throwback Thursday”) in the local paper for a year now, for free, but of course I get the bylines from those which is how I’ve built my portfolio. How would you reccomend I transition to freelancing. I’m interested in writing about legal topics for lay people…such as how to find a good attorney…and small community life…and parenting.
I am totally new to this. I stumbled across a site on my facebook news feed for “freelance writers”. My curiosity led me to discover that such a thing exist. I enjoy writing mainly for my school assignments and topics that I am passionate about just leads to words flowing effortlessly from my head. I think I really want to learn more about this now that I have discovered it’s a thing! Glad your very informative post was the first I read. Now I am even more interested. I am also stunned by your dedication to respond to each person’s response. You really love what you do.
As a business owner, there’s a good chance you’ve considered outsourcing projects or even daily tasks. Or perhaps you already do outsource. Hopefully, if you do outsource, you are looking at the Philippines. This Asian nation is a haven for driven, dedicated and diligent workers eager for a long-term, full-time opportunity. People have had positive experiences hiring Filipino virtual assistants.
Editor of Splashpress Media, Noemi used to be an English teacher before going freelance full-time. She has a penchant for words and likes to play around with them - the result of a lifetime of burying her nose in books. Having been bitten by the travel bug, she aims to discover more languages & places in the near future as she continues to do what she loves most - writing.
This particular work-at-home opportunity takes a little more work experience in general than the other four on this list, but it pays better too. Search engine evaluators examine Internet search results and give feedback as to whether they are accurate, relevant, and spam-free. To do this, the evaluator must be knowledgeable about current culture and the Internet, with good communication skills. Sometimes a college degree is required or preferred, but direct experience as a search evaluator is usually not.
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