Because of the booming popularity of audio and video, transcriptionists are finding work through a variety of different means. Many companies hire transcriptionists to turn their audio or video recordings into marketing or training materials. Video marketers (think YouTubers) may also hire transcriptionists to transcribe their recordings into written form so they can sell their services and products online. Law firms and government agencies also hire qualified legal transcriptionists to work for them.
About applying to UVOCORP, I must say, stay away from that company. I’ve been working as a Freelance writer ever since online outsourcing came to being. I encountered that company once when I am looking for other academic writing companies. But the experience is just horrible. They will have you started on a couple of assignments, and approve them right on the spot, but don’t get too excited. Once they see that you already has a few dollars on your earnings, the support sharks will flood you with multiple revisions with corresponding monetary penalties. The first and second revisions are ok, but after running your work on plagiarism checker hundreds of times and proof-reading for grammar mistakes thousands of time. They will still ask you to revise something and dissolve your earnings through penalties one after another. explaining things will not do you justice either, they wouldn’t even care what you say, they will just send your work for revision and ask for ridiculous changes that were not part of the original instructions.
While this is not technically “at home,” you can still earn great money without ever getting on the phone using your personal car, bike, or scooter to deliver food, give people rides, and even picking up groceries. The great thing about these companies is that it's also very flexible work. No one is telling you when to start and stop. You just do as much work as you can, when you can.

With that said, there are certainly a few tricks to getting your foot in the door. Our friend Kayla’s new course called “$10K VA” teaches you the exact steps she has used to make a consistent $10,000 a month. She covers topics like pitching clients, creating efficient systems, pricing your services, and more. It’s a great opportunity to hit the ground running by learning from one of the best VAs around. Learn more about the $10K VA course here.
When you work in an office, you can ask your boss about the details of your upcoming presentation when you see her in the company kitchen. But if you telecommute, she’s just another email in your inbox. From letting her know if you’re going to miss a deadline or getting clarification on an email, you’ll have to be proactive about communicating all aspects of your job and any questions you might have with her.
You mention starting a blog is beneficial for starting out and creating content. My initial fear is what to blog about, I have so many interests that I feel it’s hard to pick one and really be informed and educated about the subject. They include animals (2 time dog mom), hiking/outdoors (I live in the wonderful PNW) , motorcycles, travel, personal growth, all things sweet, and of coarse writing. How do I choose? Or somehow combine a couple?
LeapForce and Appen Butler Hill are two major firms that hire search engine evaluators. (Appen also hires social media evaluators, who analyze the relevancy of a company’s social media news feed.) Appen has potential employees complete an application (project-specific screenings and language proficiency tests may also be required), and LeapForce asks candidates to take and pass a three-part qualifying exam. Both companies also require that you have a new computer, smartphone, high-speed internet, anti-virus software, certain operating systems and be a little internet-savvy.
I am also new to the work from home world but not that new. I have done some work with MCA and SFI. Neither worked for me well. But I am a young stay at home mother of four, all children being 5 and under. And I’m looking for some part time or full time work to support me and the kids. Phone or non-phone is great. I prefer non-phone work because of the kids. And non-writing as well. Thanks for your help. 🙂

Elna, this was such an incredibly helpful wealth of information for someone (me!) who’s just dipping their toe into the water of freelance writing and hoping to make a full time career out of it. I can’t thank you enough for putting this together. This article is the first time I’ve ever heard of your blog or had the pleasure of reading your work and I’m so impressed and inspired! Honestly, I hope to be as skilled and successful as you one day. Thank you so much for giving back to up and comers like me with this article. Love love love it! Thank you!
I just discovered your blog and want to say how right on you are about the above. I’ve reached a dead end with freelance writing and after reading some of your posts, I have learned some of the reasons why, like not having an online presence for example! You’re also absolutely right about bidding sites (which was in another post). I’ve tried them before and they weren’t helpful. Anywho, I wanted to ask about #10. It seems like a great tip! But am wondering how open the web design companies are to providing writers with a list of people in need of web content? I definitely want to try this out.
Usability testers are asked to perform tests based on their demographic profile (education, knowledge of the web, age, social media use, etc.). They are then given questions to address and/or tasks to perform, such as registering on a website and then providing feedback online. Reviews usually take about 15-20 minutes and earn typically about $10 each. After completing a review, testers are not paid until the client accepts their feedback. Work can be rejected and unpaid for technical problems, lack of detail, or other issues the client determines. 
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