“I love being a part of TTEC@home because of the flexibility of the schedule. There are way more benefits to working from home than most people realize. I save money on transportation and clothing. I save time. I have a tax write-off. And I have less anxiety. The bonus of working with TTEC is that I’ve met some great people and have learned new skills.”

It’s funny because I find myself editing books that I am reading, ALL of the time!!! I wonder how these people got their jobs as editors, when I, the measly reader, can pick them out so quickly, without even trying and it drives me CRAZY to feel like I have to proofread books that I am paying over $20 a book for! I have so many stories and poetry and even a couple of novels that I have written or started writing and I always joke that when I die, someone will find my writing and only then, will I get famous for my writing. I, as the writer, would never turn something in, to have it read by anyone, without proofreading it myself either. I also want to remind everyone that often times, when we are just writing a comment, we may often accidentally hit the wrong key and submit our comments, without proofreading what we have written… it doesn’t necessarily make anyone unintelligent… thank you for a lot of good info on here
Although some online and technical colleges offer degree programs in web design, many of the skills you need can be self-taught. However, there are some technical design elements that you’ll need to learn and can help you stand out. Before investing thousands in a degree program, you may want to check out some of the web design courses on Udemy instead.
How brilliant you are Elna. I went through your website and I could feel such positivity in your words. I really want to congratulate you on the kind of person you have turned out to be. There are very few people who sound as enlightened as you do. Your help through the words on this blog will definitely help me because if they don’t I don’t know what would. Keep it up Elna, go as far as the wind.
Thank you for this post. I just recently got into freelance writing and I feel so stupid already. I found a blog that suggested odesk so I signed up with them and since I didn’t have a portfolio yet I applied for a job paying $20 for 10 articles due in one week. I’m halfway done but after reading this I don’t even want to complete the rest. I feel so cheated. I thought it would be a good way to get some experience under my belt but I have put so much time and energy in the articles I have done so far and it doesn’t even seem worth it. Should I even complete the job?
User testing is another one of those prime easy remote jobs! All you have to do is look at a website or mobile app, complete an activity as requested or just look around, and then give your thoughts on the website or app. Sometimes, your screen will be recorded while you complete the test and speak your thoughts out loud. Other times, you may be asked to write out your brief thoughts. Either way, the only real technical requirements are to have a home computer (that you can install the screen recording software on) and high-speed Internet access or particular type of smartphone.
I appreciate the idea behind this, but I’d like more information on where these jobs can be found. I am a writer and would like to do freelance writing work, but while you mentioned that there are such jobs available, there wasn’t much to say where to find those jobs. I’ve tried to seek them out before, and done writing for places where I got paid (usually not very well), but many of those have dried up or weren’t much to begin with. Are there suggested places to go to do some freelance writing? I’d love to ditch my poorly-paying job, where I have to spend a lot of time away from my family, and do something I actually enjoy doing. Thanks.
Usability testers are asked to perform tests based on their demographic profile (education, knowledge of the web, age, social media use, etc.). They are then given questions to address and/or tasks to perform, such as registering on a website and then providing feedback online. Reviews usually take about 15-20 minutes and earn typically about $10 each. After completing a review, testers are not paid until the client accepts their feedback. Work can be rejected and unpaid for technical problems, lack of detail, or other issues the client determines. 
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