For example, if you type in “banana bread recipe,” search engines should pull up recipes from major sites first. Posts from smaller blogs or recipes for other, related dishes—like zucchini bread—should fall toward the end of the list. As a search engine evaluator, you’ll be asked to enter specific words or phrases into a search engine, then assess how appropriate and informative the sites it pulls up are.
Of course, FlexJobs is not the only site for finding remote work and jobs you can do from home. Upwork is the largest marketplace for freelancers in the world, with demand for nearly any remote-friendly skill set. Then there are the niche sites, like We Work Remotely, where the majority of job posters are early stage startups looking for talented engineers. Still, FlexJobs may be the winner: its robust, easy-to-navigate system offers tens of thousands of jobs from thousands of employers at any one time. If you’re serious about finding remote work you can do from home or on the road, there’s no better place to look.
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“I first learned about TTEC from the university I was attending. I thought it would be a great idea to get a job working from home while going to school. When I first started working for the company, I was a seasonal agent. This grew into a permanent agent position. TTEC has enabled me to earn a degree, provide support to my family, gain skills in communication and technology, and meet great people from different parts of the world. What a wonderful company to work for! Every day is a great day here at TTEC!”


Hi Elna. Great post. I’ve been a freelance writer, and digital nomad for three years now. I, unfortunately, started out on one of the writing mills that pays very little. I made quite a bit on there, but eventually left as I was writing 8-10 hours a day for next to nothing. I’ve tried a number of your suggestions and the one I’ve had the most luck with, by far, was cold contacting. I’ll contact 10-12 websites a day and send them a sample of my work. I get a few new clients a week, plus all of my repeat customers. It’s gotten to the point I need junior writers to pick up some of the slack. For anyone out there interested in being a freelance writer there’s plenty of work out there.
LeapForce and Appen Butler Hill are two major firms that hire search engine evaluators. (Appen also hires social media evaluators, who analyze the relevancy of a company’s social media news feed.) Appen has potential employees complete an application (project-specific screenings and language proficiency tests may also be required), and LeapForce asks candidates to take and pass a three-part qualifying exam. Both companies also require that you have a new computer, smartphone, high-speed internet, anti-virus software, certain operating systems and be a little internet-savvy.
While it may seem like these sites are your best best when you’re a newcomer, they’re largely a crapshoot when it comes to winning a project. These sites are a rush for the lowest bid, and you’re competing against hundreds if not thousands of other desperate freelancers prepared to sell their firstborn for the chance to write someone’s 250-page ebook. (Some writers have been able to make a decent buck on sites like Upwork, but they are often the exception rather than the rule and have usually invested huge amounts of time to make it happen.)
Because lawyers are seeking people who match the profile of potential real-life jurors, online jury companies ask detailed questions of applicants. You should never disclose your Social Security number or credit card or banking info. Companies typically pay $10 to $60 to online jurors. Since most online jury companies won’t need a lot of jurors, signing up for multiple companies gives you a better chance of getting picked for “jury duty.” 
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