These are not get-rich-quick opportunities. You will need to work but the potential is there. As an example, the second one on our list is freelance writing. If you're a good writer, you can hit the ground running and earn hundreds of dollars to write once you find the right clients. If you're not a good writer, you may get paid less as you get better and find more clients. The potential is there but so is the work.
As a transcriptionist, you will transcribe either video or voice recordings into written words. Although medical transcription is what usually comes to mind, the fact is that there is now far more need for general transcriptionists. With businesses and bloggers turning increasingly to podcasts and video to reach their audiences, these mediums are often turned into written content for marketing purposes or training materials.
Although there are thousands of legitimate work-at-home jobs available, it’s always a good idea to proceed with caution. There are plenty of less than stellar opportunities out there, promising big results with little or no return. While some of these are just bad gigs, others are straight up scams, looking to prey on dreams of those looking for a real work-at-home jobs.
While it may seem like these sites are your best best when you’re a newcomer, they’re largely a crapshoot when it comes to winning a project. These sites are a rush for the lowest bid, and you’re competing against hundreds if not thousands of other desperate freelancers prepared to sell their firstborn for the chance to write someone’s 250-page ebook. (Some writers have been able to make a decent buck on sites like Upwork, but they are often the exception rather than the rule and have usually invested huge amounts of time to make it happen.)

Although many medical transcriptionists work for hospitals or physician’s offices, most are able to work at home, and at a time or place of their choosing. Since their tasks involve transcribing recorded medical dictation, a computer, desk, and earpiece are generally the only requirements after completing a postsecondary medical transcriptionist program.
This particular work-at-home opportunity takes a little more work experience in general than the other four on this list, but it pays better too. Search engine evaluators examine Internet search results and give feedback as to whether they are accurate, relevant, and spam-free. To do this, the evaluator must be knowledgeable about current culture and the Internet, with good communication skills. Sometimes a college degree is required or preferred, but direct experience as a search evaluator is usually not.

This past year has been a roller coaster ride for me. I want to give freelance writing a try. I did get accepted to a content mill site, but the jobs on there go so fast I can never get a chance to grab one to work on. 🙁 I do not have a portfolio and I’ve never made one. I also do not blog anymore. So, how can I get into freelance writing? How do I build up a portfolio or show my writing? Free hosting is all I can do now, and I’m sure that is going to be a turn off to a client. Any tips would be great. Thanks.


A few other things I plan to try: 1) buying cheap advertising in some niche publications where writing services aren’t usually advertised but the need is high; 2) adding an online content store to my author’s website I’m developing, so I can sell ready-made content directly to clients (kind of like Constant Content but without the middle man); and 3) pitching to website developers who might want to offer content services as a package deal to their clients. I have no idea if any of these strategies will work, but it’s always better to do something than nothing, right?

I worked as a freelance academic writer for about 5 years and Uvocorp was one of the 7-8 sites I worked with. I totally agree with Norbert. Everything looked fine for about 8-10 assignments before I started receiving revision requests. I had them review their comments and remove fines for the first two revision requests. However, I just gave up when I got the next seemingly senseless plagiarism remark. I was not sure if it was unintentional from their part, but I felt annoyed and disappointed by then.
8. Microworkers – Microworkers, as the name implies, is another microtask site. They offer a variety of tasks, and some of those may include data entry. Some of the jobs they offer actually pay better than similar jobs on other microtask sites. They also show you a percentage on each job that demonstrates how often that job poster has approved the work of previous workers. Your only paid for approved work, so that’s useful! Payment for completed jobs goes directly to your PayPal account once you hit their $10 payout threshold. Be vigilant against scam jobs offered through Microworkers.

Thanks so much! Yes I like warm pitching, but sometimes I have better success just using job boards. I’m a bit impatient 🙂 and have a million things on my plate so when I can, I’ll do some warm pitching. I’m finding for me, the best chance of my landing work is via referrals. Once you have those awesome clients, there’s a goldmine more clients and more money!


Thank you for this post. I just recently got into freelance writing and I feel so stupid already. I found a blog that suggested odesk so I signed up with them and since I didn’t have a portfolio yet I applied for a job paying $20 for 10 articles due in one week. I’m halfway done but after reading this I don’t even want to complete the rest. I feel so cheated. I thought it would be a good way to get some experience under my belt but I have put so much time and energy in the articles I have done so far and it doesn’t even seem worth it. Should I even complete the job?
“I love being a part of TTEC@home because of the flexibility of the schedule. There are way more benefits to working from home than most people realize. I save money on transportation and clothing. I save time. I have a tax write-off. And I have less anxiety. The bonus of working with TTEC is that I’ve met some great people and have learned new skills.”
I thoroughly enjoyed the article and am waiting for my husband to get off work to discuss taking your course. I have been struggling to find the next step in my career and I keep leaving my job searches to research free lance writing instead. I have always loved writing creatively and journaling, and I think I’m ready to really jump into this for a career.
This is wonderful, I am a beginner just looking for ideas and “how to” on becoming a freelance writer. I stumbled onto this article in my search and it seemed to put an ease on things. I had no idea where to even begin, but with your 20 suggestions, I feel maybe I can get started. I have only written a little poetry, so this is a new direction for me. I am currently working on my Associates in business, so I have a little free time to try this out. Thanks for sharing this and giving insight on the subject, it is appreciated!

“I love being a part of TTEC@home because of the flexibility of the schedule. There are way more benefits to working from home than most people realize. I save money on transportation and clothing. I save time. I have a tax write-off. And I have less anxiety. The bonus of working with TTEC is that I’ve met some great people and have learned new skills.”
The first are tasks you don’t enjoy doing. These are things that you know how to do, but don’t enjoy. Second, are tasks you shouldn’t do. These are things you know how to do and may even enjoy, but may not be the best use of your time. Third, are tasks you can’t do. These are things that need doing, but you don’t have the skills or expertise to follow through with them at this moment.
Because lawyers are seeking people who match the profile of potential real-life jurors, online jury companies ask detailed questions of applicants. You should never disclose your Social Security number or credit card or banking info. Companies typically pay $10 to $60 to online jurors. Since most online jury companies won’t need a lot of jurors, signing up for multiple companies gives you a better chance of getting picked for “jury duty.” 
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