I recently came across some of your posts after searching for new ways to find and pitch freelance writing clients. While I’ve been working as a freelancer for a few years now, it never hurts to look for ways to expand my business. There’s a lot of crap out there on the Web that offers the same old suggestions for locating writing clients (usually accompanied by a heavy sales pitch to sign up for an expensive workshop). This article offered fresh ideas and unique details about the standard job sources–I was really impressed! Thank you! I am going to put some of these ideas into my business plan this month.
Although very little data are available for this work-at-home job since it is relatively new, thousands of listings for social media managers can be found on sites like CareerBuilder.com, SimplyHired.com, and Upwork.com. If you have a demonstrated command of social media and a sizable following, you might even be able to get started by reaching out to companies directly and asking if they need help.

Hi Elna! Thoroughly enjoyed this delightful, informative article. I am a full time paralegal with a B.A. in Journalism. I’m about 5 years away from retirement…and would like to shift from full time paralegal work to freelance writing. I’ve been writing a column (“Throwback Thursday”) in the local paper for a year now, for free, but of course I get the bylines from those which is how I’ve built my portfolio. How would you reccomend I transition to freelancing. I’m interested in writing about legal topics for lay people…such as how to find a good attorney…and small community life…and parenting.
For example, if you type in “banana bread recipe,” search engines should pull up recipes from major sites first. Posts from smaller blogs or recipes for other, related dishes—like zucchini bread—should fall toward the end of the list. As a search engine evaluator, you’ll be asked to enter specific words or phrases into a search engine, then assess how appropriate and informative the sites it pulls up are.
I forgot to also share that I will be starting work with On Point as an Advocacy Coordinator too. It sounds like a great job that helps our fellow Americans keep informed about political issues. On Point is the voice of the average citizens that may have an opinion to share with their politicians but have no way of knowing how to contact them. On Point makes sure those voices get heard. In orientation the trainer said she will be hiring agents again around the middle of June. If you have good writing skills and are a good conversationalist then you may want to check it out. It also seems like if you put forth a little effort, you can make decent wages with them and they do pay weekly. I’m not big into politics but excited about this new venture.
Also, I personally have a membership to FlexJobs. It's $14.95 a month, but you get access to carefully curated, guaranteed scam-free work from home job leads. It's not for everyone, but I've overall been impressed with the site. It may be worth signing up for a month just to see if you think it will benefit you in your job search. Canceling is very easy if you don't think it's for you.

This is my foot in the door and I’m following some of your other tips in order to get myself out there even more. I’m an introvert, so this is new and difficult for me. I have questioned myself countless times and am feeling a bit impatient, but I’m trying to trust the process and take it one day at a time. The warmth and encouragement that come through in your writing have helped keep me going. Thank you Elna!
I am glad this topic is ongoing and agree with Catherine’s assessment. Outsourcing and exporting work over-seas occurred in my former profession by the Medical Transcription Services, and it seems a fact of life in my 2-month stint as a content article writer. I work for a “content mill” at the moment which is entry level to me but work is often sporadic and glad to have a patient working spouse at the moment! The content mill has an author forum which is helpful for learning the ropes and venting! I did apply to The Writers Hub, and was surprised when they asked what my per page rate would be? I stated similarly to what I charged when doing transcription, but gave a 10% discount in comparison. I am hoping to network locally with a non-proffit in the coming weeks and eventually find a content article opportunity that pays decently, desires my talents, and provides a reasonable degree of work or referrals. Perhaps that is what the majority of us want here.
oDesk has put me under supervision based on negative feedback from clients even though my rating is 4.77. One client said that he already had 700 words. When I looked at what he wrote, it was on a sixth-grade level. No research, statistics, compelling copy, SEO keywords, etc. So I had to start from scratch. I ended up acting like a tutor. Another client loved my work but kept disappearing. I asked for her website address, information about her company, etc. She let another week go by then disappeared again. I could go on and on. I think that clients who use the content mills do believe that they can get stellar writing for peanuts. I believe these incidents are blessings in disguise. I’ve had my wake-up call. I follow top-notch bloggers and copywriters and hone my skills continually. It is up to the freelancer to determine his standards and ultimately his worth.
Because the fee is so small but the task takes so little time, the strategy is to do as many of them as possible. However, be sure to read the fine print because many of these companies have a minimum payout, meaning that if you earn $8.55 doing 20 micro jobs, you may have to wait until you’ve earned as much as $50 to actually get your money. Read more about some of the pitfalls of this kind of work.
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